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I am trying to extend an Object of the following structure (with JQuery in Coffeescript):

objectThatIsAList = {
  'List Item'      : 
    callback       :=>
      return "Some value"
  'Another item'   :
    callback       :=>
      return "Another value"
  'The final item' :
    callback       :=>
      no
}

This Object is used as a (dynamic) model for a dropdown menu in a large coffeescript-based framework.

I am extending it with

objectThatIsAList = $.extend {}, objectThatIsAList,  {
  'New Item' :
    callback :=>
      return "New stuff"
}

This results in an Object like this (comments added to show intended outcome)

objectThatIsAList = {
  'List Item'      : 
    callback       :=>
      return "Some value"
  'Another item'   :
    callback       :=>
      return "Another value"

  # this should be last
  'The final item' :
    callback       :=>
      no

  # this should not be last
  'New Item'       :
    callback       :=>
      return "New stuff"
}

Obviously, the object gets extended correctly, however the order of properties is relevant for the purpose of building a list. I'd much rather want the 'Final Item' as the fourth and not the third property of the extended Object.

But my research did not show indexing support for the $.extend method. Has anyone successfully implemented such a feature and/or has tips how to go about 'inserting' object properties into another object at a certain position?

Or is there a clever way to reposition that final item after the $.extend?

Does not necessarily have to be Coffee, even JS or Pseudocode would be of great help.

EDIT:

This is the solution that i have come up with that extends the legacy code to take arrays and convert them to objects (that are being used extensively all over the framework and where changing the original code would break alot of working code):

# this comparison yields a data object that is passed to a method rendering a menu
if o.menu instanceof Array
  menuArrayToObj = {}
  for menuObject in o.menu
    for menuObjectProperty,menuObjectValue of menuObject
      menuArrayToObj[menuObjectProperty]=menuObjectValue if menuObjectProperty? and menuObjectValue?
  o.menu = menuArrayToObj
else o.menu 

With this in place, it can either be fed an object or a array. The latter is easily inserted into with splice.

share|improve this question
2  
How do you expect to index an object? Ordering of JS Object properties is undefined by design. –  raina77ow Oct 16 '12 at 22:59
    
That's the problem I'm facing or rather trying to circumvent. The menu-generating method that I am interfacing with is not equipped to use arrays to build it's output (and that's bad, but for now unchangeable), so I am trying to find a way to have my cake and eat it too. Until now, there was no need to have this functionality because the menus were completely "designed" on creation, but I am adding a dynamic element to the functionality. I am aware that redesigning the original code is the proper way to do it, but I am looking for a (rather dirty) way to prototype this without changing legacy. –  arvidkahl Oct 17 '12 at 2:52
1  
@arvidkahl seriously, redesign your menu code now while you have the chance. Just because on some browsers elements happen to be enumerated in the order they were inserted, doesn't mean all browsers will. For all you know, on some browsers the items will come up in reverse order, or in some random order. The only way to guarantee order is to use an ordered array. –  Alnitak Oct 17 '12 at 6:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Javascript objects are by definition unordered.

If you wish to maintain an ordering you need an Array instead.

A good example of this is the jQueryUI dialog object. Although it's possible to use an Object in the way you have for the buttons option, if you require the individual buttons to be in a specific order then you have to supply an array of objects.

Using this model, your object would look like:

arrayThatIsAList = [
  { title: 'List Item', callback: ... },
  { title: 'Another Item', callback: ... },
  { title: 'New Item', callback: ... },
  { title: 'The final item', callback: ... }
];
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. Since the Object in question needs to be a non-array Object (due to legacy code interacting with it), I will try to implement a two-way-conversion (obj->array, inserting the new object's properties into that array at index i, array->obj). I will update my question once I find a working solution. –  arvidkahl Oct 17 '12 at 2:23

$.extend() is used to merge 2 or more objects into one. It does not manage order.

If you want to order your data, you should use an array of object (it allow you to manipulate data with its index) and use a custom sort function that will compare your object title:

yourArray.sort(sortfunction);

function sortfunction(yourObjectA, yourObjectB){
    //Compare yourObjectA and yourObjectB, and return -1, 0, or 1
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting idea with the sort, this would make for a nifty addition to the frameworks class that handles the kind of data I am trying to extend. –  arvidkahl Oct 17 '12 at 2:24

Put the object with the property that goes first as the first argument in the call to $.extend:

objectThatIsAList = $.extend { 
  'New Item' : 
    callback :=> 
      return "New stuff" 
}, objectThatIsAList

"No!", you cry out, "The ECMAScript specification explictly leaves property enumeration ordering undefined!"

Yes, true. Valid point. But, all modern ECMAScript implementations enumerate properties in the order in which they were defined. It becomes a de facto standard. Try it here: jsfiddle.net/TqfNE. I doubt anyone can find a browser that lists the properties in an order other than the definition order.

So, it's not guaranteed per the spec, but for all practical purposes, it works consistently.

Note, however, that if you start using integers as property names, you will get inconsistent results between browsers.

share|improve this answer
    
This ordering strategy crossed my mind, but it would only handle cases where I want to insert the new object properties right "before" any other properties. Thank you for quoting ECMA spec and most of all implementing a proof-of-concept. It seems strange that there is a focus on NOT making it enumeratable(sp?) when this would be a feature that served a certain purpose, even when not needed in every implementation case. –  arvidkahl Oct 17 '12 at 2:28

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