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I'm trying to figure this out for some time but I'm not successful. How is following function (powerset) proceeding in detail, taking the example input argument of [1,2,3]? Thank you much for help.

fun ps L = foldl (fn (x,tl) => tl @ map (fn xs => x::xs) tl) [[]] L;

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To use the function correctly, you have to assume there is no duplication in input lists.

The function can be understood as follows:

  • We start with an accumulator which is a set of sets only consisting of an empty set ([[]]).
  • In each step, we take every set in the accumulator, add the current element x to them and add these results to the accumulator.
  • The final result is a set of all possible sets of n elements i.e. powerset.

To be easily express traces, let's create an auxiliary function f

fun f (x, tl) = tl @ map (fn xs => x::xs) tl

Now we have a trace for [1, 2, 3]:

   ps [1, 2, 3]

~> foldl f [[]] [1, 2, 3] (* Step 1 *)
~> foldl f (f (1, [[]])) [2, 3]
~> foldl f ([[]] @ map (fn xs => 1::xs) [[]]) [2, 3]

~> foldl f [[], [1]] [2, 3] (* Step 2 *)
~> foldl f (f (2, [[], [1]])) [3]
~> foldl f ([[], [1]] @ map (fn xs => 2::xs) [[], [1]]) [3]

~> foldl f [[], [1], [2], [2, 1]] [3] (* Step 3 *)
~> foldl f (f (3, [[], [1], [2], [2, 1]])) []
~> foldl f ([[], [1], [2], [2, 1]] @ map (fn xs => 3::xs) [[], [1], [2], [2, 1]]) []

~> foldl f [[], [1], [2], [2, 1], [3], [3, 1], [3, 2], [3, 2, 1]] [] (* Step 4 *)

~> [[], [1], [2], [2, 1], [3], [3, 1], [3, 2], [3, 2, 1]] (* Final result *)
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Thank you much for taking your time, Pad! –  Givanovitch Oct 17 '12 at 20:14
    
You're welcome. Glad that I can help. –  pad Oct 17 '12 at 20:49

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