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I was trying to evaluate how rvalue references effect the design of the class. Say I have an existing class as shown below

class X
{
   string internal;

public:
   void set_data(const char* s)
   {
      internal = s;
   }
..
..
..
//other stuff

};

This class is used by another module like this:

//another module
{

    string configvalue;
    X x;

    //read configvalue from a file and call set 

    ...
    x.set_data(configvalue.c_str());

    //use x to do some magic
    ..
    ...


}

with rvalue references in place will it be better to provide another member function like so

class X
{
...
...
....
 void set_data(string s)
 {
     internal = std::move(s);
 }
};

This will allow the clients of this class to use move semantics and prevent one set of allocate/copy operations per use. This is a highly concocted example but does the same principle apply to all class designs without breaking the 'minimal interface' paradigm.

Anybody insights on this matter are greatly appreciated?

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2 Answers

Yes, adding the string overload as you suggest is a good idea. Even without rvalue references such an overload would be a good idea. Otherwise, given a std::string s, to use it would have to:

x.set_data(s.c_str());

whereas

x.set_data(s);

is so much more intuitive (and even slightly more efficient) for the clients of X.

As another option, you could add these two overloads:

void set_data(const string& s) {internal = s;}
void set_data(string&& s)      {internal = std::move(s);}

This is roughly equivalent to the single overload you correctly suggested. There is a very slight performance advantage for the two-overload solution. The single-overload solution will cost an extra string move construction when the argument passed is an xvalue (an lvalue that has been cast with std::move). But the move constructor of std::string should be really fast, so this should not be a big deal. I mention it only in the spirit of full disclosure.

If set_data has more than one parameter, the "by-value" approach becomes much more attractive. For example consider the case where you need to pass in two strings. Your choices are:

Solution 1

void set_data(string s1, string s2);

Solution 2

void set_data(const string&  s1, const string&  s2);
void set_data(      string&& s1, const string&  s2);
void set_data(const string&  s1,       string&& s2);
void set_data(      string&& s1,       string&& s2);

As you can quickly see, Solution 2 scales poorly with the number of parameters.

Finally, in no circumstance should you attempt to apply both solutions to the same type:

Don't do this!

void set_data(string s)        {internal = std::move(s);}
void set_data(const string& s) {internal = s;}
void set_data(string&& s)      {internal = std::move(s);}

This set of overloads will be ambiguous. Just as in C++03 the following two overloads are ambiguous:

void set_data(string s)        {internal = std::move(s);}
void set_data(const string& s) {internal = s;}

Never overload by-value with reference, either lvalue reference nor rvalue reference.

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void set_data(const string& s) {internal = s;} void set_data(string&& s) {internal = std::move(s);}, when will first get called and when will second? –  Baiyan Huang Nov 17 '12 at 6:55
    
The first version will prefer to bind to lvalues ... the second version will prefer to bind to rvalues as well as lvalues wrapped in std::move. –  Jason Nov 17 '12 at 6:57
    
Regarding your multiple parameters passing - yes, it scales poorly - but this shouldn't be the reason to choose the "by-value" approach. It can be easily resolved (and probably should be for design considerations) by storing the arguments in a single config object which will be passed by reference to the overloaded function - reducing the problem to the original one with single argument –  icepack Nov 17 '12 at 6:57
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I don't see a reason to have both void set_data(const char* s) and void set_data(string s) as part of the interface. This will create an ambiguity and is prone to side-effects. Moreover, you still pass the argument by value in call to set_data(string s). Instead I would suggest defining the 2 following funcs:

void set_data(const string &s);
void set_data(string &&s);

This way you can have 2 implementations, first will deep copy your string and second one can steal the internals of the string since it's an rvalue (make sure to leave it in a defined state so the destructor will be able to destroy it without problem - for details see http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2006/n2027.html#Move_Semantics).

The second version will be invoked automatically either on rvalue string argument or if argument is forced to rvalue, for example by std::move.

If you want to have a by-value option as well you can use the rvalue version of this API combined with string copy constructor: set_data(string(str)).

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1  
Have you coded up your suggestion? –  Howard Hinnant Nov 16 '12 at 16:14
    
@HowardHinnant No. Have you? –  icepack Nov 16 '12 at 17:50
    
Yes. When I implement your first two set_data and call with an rvalue string, my compiler complains of an ambiguity. When I add your 3rd set_data overload, I also get an ambiguity when calling with an lvalue string. –  Howard Hinnant Nov 16 '12 at 20:04
    
a, yes - because of by value. It should be removed and if needed the same result can be achieved by the other two and some kind of clone method, for example –  icepack Nov 17 '12 at 6:34
    
@HowardHinnant a, yes, you're right - because of the by value. It should be removed and if needed the same result can be achieved by the other two and some kind of clone method, for example. I've edited the answer. –  icepack Nov 17 '12 at 6:50
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