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So I am trying to get expect within bash to work correctly.

Here is the script contents...

[root@mysql1 ~]# cat mysql_repl.sh
#!/bin/bash
read -p "Master server ip: " masterip
read -p "What is the regular user to log into the master server: " masteruser
read -p "What is the password for the regular user for the master server: " masterpass
read -p "What is the root password for the master server: " masterrootpass

read -p "Slave server ip: " slaveip
read -p "What is the regular user to log into the slave server: " slaveuser
read -p "What is the password for the regular user for the slave server: " slavepass
read -p "What is the root password for the slave server: " slaverootpass



expect -c "set slaveip $slaveip;\
set slaveuser $slaveuser;\
set slavepass $slavepass;\
set timeout -1;\
spawn /usr/bin/ssh $slaveip -l $slaveuser 'ls -lart';\
match_max 100000;
expect *password:;\
send -- $slavepass\r;\
interact;"

Here is the output of the script...

[root@mysql1 ~]# ./mysql_repl.sh
Master server ip:
What is the regular user to log into the master server:
What is the password for the regular user for the master server:
What is the root password for the master server:
Slave server ip: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
What is the regular user to log into the slave server: rack
What is the password for the regular user for the slave server: test
What is the root password for the slave server: DVJrPey99grJ
spawn /usr/bin/ssh 198.61.221.179 -l rack 'ls -lart'
rack@198.61.221.179's password:
bash: ls -lart: command not found

The command is not executing correctly. I also tried /bin/ls and it still can not find it.

Second Part... same script...

I have a variable in bash, specifically, a password. In this case the password is "as$5!@?" What I want to do is go through each character, test if it is a special character and escape out of it. So for instance...

pass=as$5!@?

What I have so far is close but not working for special characters, it will work for non-special...

echo -n $pass | while read -n 1 c; do [[ "$c" = [!@#$%^&*().] ]] && echo -n "\\"; echo -n $c; done

Anyone have thoughts on how I can add a \ before each special character?

Hope that clears up the question.

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6  
    
So what I want to do is use 'expect -c' within a bash script because I am pretty decent at bash but know nothing about expect. I am reading a password from a user and then assign that password to a variable. I am taking that password and entering it into """expect -c "set timeout -1;\ spawn ssh ${slaveip} -l ${slaveuser} 'ls -lart';\ match_max 100000; expect password:;\ send -- ${slavepass}\r;\ interact;" –  user1601716 Oct 17 '12 at 2:18
1  
Did you try quoting it? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 17 '12 at 2:24
    
Rather than just providing a list, can you define what makes a "special" character so special? –  ghoti Oct 17 '12 at 3:57
    
As for being "decent" in bash ... this is "covered with a towel" decent, right? Not the sort of thing you'd show in public, but fine for an emergency ring of the door bell? –  ghoti Oct 17 '12 at 3:58
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your last line block, try manually adding a \ before each special character that needs to be escaped. That shouldn't be much work.

Also, use == for the equality check, i.e.:

echo -n $pass | while read -n 1 c; do [[ "$c" == [!@#$%^&*().] ]] && echo -n "\\"; echo -n $c; done
share|improve this answer
    
This worked.... two things tho, I needed to put the pass in single quotes to not have it interpereted and needed to escape all the specials. Thanks! –  user1601716 Oct 17 '12 at 11:57
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