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I wrote a template to have a valid usage only when a struct, class has overloaded bool operator== otherwise compiler errors would come up,

namespace atn {
    template <typename T>
    bool find( std::vector<T>& cont, T find ) {
        for( std::vector<T>::iterator it = cont.begin(); it != cont.end(); ++it ) {
            if( (*it) == find )
                return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
};

So fine it is ok, for example:

struct sPlayer {
    u_int idPlayer;
    sPlayer() : idPlayer(0) {};
    bool operator==( const sPlayer& ref ) const {
        return ref.idPlayer == this->idPlayer;
    };
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) {
    std::vector<sPlayer>a;
    sPlayer player;
    player.idPlayer = 5;
    a.push_back(player);
    if(atn::find(a, player)){
        std::cout << "Found" << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

The thing is, if I use it this way:

vector<int>hold;
if(atn::find(hold, 4))

I got lost at this part, the templates assumes the type of T to be assigned at vector<T> by the value of the second parameter passed? Or it'll assume from the type of the vector reference passed?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both arguments have to match. Template argument deduction tries to find a type for each template argument that makes the function argument types match the type of the supplied arguments.

Sometimes this gets a bit tricky, and things that should work don't. For example:

std::vector<int> v;
atn::find(v, 1U);

This fails, because the first argument wants to deduce T = int, but the second argument wants T = unsigned int. The deduction fails and the code doesn't compile. (If this is a problem, then the solution is to make all but one function argument non-deduced.)

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the templates assumes the type of T to be assigned at vector by the value of the second parameter passed? or it'll assume from the type of the vector reference passed?

Neither. The compiler will infer the type of each of the arguments separately, and then it will verify that the inferred type is the same for all cases. If the inferred type is not the same for all arguments it will fail to compile.

One common example of this is the std::max (or std::min) template:

template <typename T>
T min( T lhs, T rhs ) {
   return (lhs < rhs? lhs : rhs);
}
int main() {
   min(1,1u);  // error
}
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