Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The (brief) documentation for scipy.integrate.ode says that two methods (dopri5 and dop853) have stepsize control and dense output. Looking at the examples and the code itself, I can only see a very simple way to get output from an integrator. Namely, it looks like you just step the integrator forward by some fixed dt, get the function value(s) at that time, and repeat.

My problem has pretty variable timescales, so I'd like to just get the values at whatever time steps it needs to evaluate to achieve the required tolerances. That is, early on, things are changing slowly, so the output time steps can be big. But as things get interesting, the output time steps have to be smaller. I don't actually want dense output at equal intervals, I just want the time steps the adaptive function uses.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I've been looking at this to try to get the same result. It turns out you can use a hack to get the step-by-step results by setting nsteps=1 in the ode instantiation. It will generate a UserWarning at every step (this can be caught and suppressed).

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import ode
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import warnings


def logistic(t, y, r):
    return r * y * (1.0 - y)

r = .01
t0 = 0
y0 = 1e-5
t1 = 5000.0

#backend = 'vode'
backend = 'dopri5'
#backend = 'dop853'

solver = ode(logistic).set_integrator(backend, nsteps=1)
solver.set_initial_value(y0, t0).set_f_params(r)
# suppress Fortran-printed warning
solver._integrator.iwork[2] = -1

sol = []
warnings.filterwarnings("ignore", category=UserWarning)
while solver.t < t1:
    solver.integrate(t1, step=True)
    sol.append([solver.t, solver.y])
warnings.resetwarnings()
sol = np.array(sol)

plt.plot(sol[:,0], sol[:,1], 'b.-')
plt.show()

result:

share|improve this answer
    
That seems to do the job, alright. Now, if only I hadn't spent weeks porting my code to GSL... :) –  Mike Jan 22 '13 at 22:41
2  
It turns out you can suppress the Fortran-emitted warning with this little hack solver._integrator.iwork[2] = -1 (I'll edit the above code to show this). This sets a flag passed through the Fortran interface that suppresses printing to stdout. –  Tim D Jan 23 '13 at 21:35
add comment

The integrate method accepts a boolean argument step that tells the method to return a single internal step. However, it appears that the 'dopri5' and 'dop853' solvers do not support it.

The following code shows how you can get the internal steps taken by the solver when the 'vode' solver is used:

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import ode
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


def logistic(t, y, r):
    return r * y * (1.0 - y)

r = .01

t0 = 0
y0 = 1e-5
t1 = 5000.0

backend = 'vode'
#backend = 'dopri5'
#backend = 'dop853'
solver = ode(logistic).set_integrator(backend)
solver.set_initial_value(y0, t0).set_f_params(r)

sol = []
while solver.successful() and solver.t < t1:
    solver.integrate(t1, step=True)
    sol.append([solver.t, solver.y])

sol = np.array(sol)

plt.plot(sol[:,0], sol[:,1], 'b.-')
plt.show()

Result: Plot of the solution

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, I was afraid that was the case. I was hoping that there'd be an easy way to extend dopri5 and dop853, but my patience ends at fortran, so I think I'll just re-implement a time stepper. Seems a shame, though, that python is left without robust, efficient, and flexible integrators... –  Mike Oct 17 '12 at 14:59
    
I needed this same functionality while trying to convert a MATLAB script that uses ode45. I've submitted a ticket at Scipy.org Ticket#1820. –  Tim D Jan 22 '13 at 20:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.