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The Goal:

  • Execute logic on each element in array.
  • Wait X ms in between next execution.
  • mouseover(#slider) pauses delay - If delay = 1000ms, and 300ms had passed, mouseout(#slider) would trigger resume counting down the remaining 700ms delay.
  • After execution on last element, loop back to do it again - forever.

Here's a visual explanation:

var = s Array(1,2,3)

var x = s[1];   //get first element   
console.log(x); //do something to it
wait();         //START wait timer 1000ms

//------------> timer : 300ms
//------------> user  : mouseover (#slider) : pause timer
//------------> user  : waited 5000ms
//------------> user  : mouseout  (#slider) : resume timer
//------------> timer : 300ms --> still 700ms to go!
//------------> timer : 500ms
//------------> user  : mouseover (#slider) : pause timer
//------------> user  : waited 10000ms
//------------> user  : mouseout  (#slider) : resume timer
//------------> timer : 500ms --> still 500ms to go!

var x = s[2];   //get second element   
console.log(x); //do something to it
wait();         //START wait timer 1000ms

//------------> timer : 200ms
//------------> user  : mouseover (#slider) : pause timer
//------------> user  : onclick   (.slideButton1) : change index of array and clear timer
//------------> user  : waited 6000ms
//------------> user  : mouseout  (#slider) : resume timer
//------------> timer : 0ms --> still 1000ms to go!

var x = s[1];   //get first element   ( index was changed by clicking button )
console.log(x); //do something to it
wait();         //START wait timer 1000ms

// ... s[2] ... s[3] ...
//theres nothing else in the array, lets start back from s[1] again!

Solutions:

jQuery:

http://jsfiddle.net/zGd8a/8/

This solution came from a related post. The official source of this plugin can be found here.

Native JS:

http://jsfiddle.net/SyTFZ/4/

This Answer by Aadit M Shah was really helpful. He also goes into detail about Delta Timing and how it can be useful in similar cases.

New Goal:

Abstract up either of these methods to allow use for other things.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Oct 26 '12 at 12:20

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Completed your slider: jsfiddle.net/SyTFZ –  Aadit M Shah Oct 18 '12 at 2:00
    
I'll edit my answer to explain what's happening soon. –  Aadit M Shah Oct 18 '12 at 2:00
    
Updated code: jsfiddle.net/SyTFZ/1 –  Aadit M Shah Oct 18 '12 at 2:07
    
I updated my answer. The latest version of the demo is here: jsfiddle.net/SyTFZ/4 –  Aadit M Shah Oct 18 '12 at 2:57
    
@AaditMShah This is a really great solution. Your level of effort to answer this question is awsome. Porting this logic for other things has lots of potential. I will definatly spend a chunk of time disecting this tomorow. –  Dan Kanze Oct 18 '12 at 3:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Okay, I don't use jquery and in all probability I have no clue as to what you're trying to achieve. However from what I understand I think you should do something like this:

var i = 0;
var t = this;

var timer = new DeltaTimer(function (time) {
    // your animation
    var x = t.s[i];
    x.delay("1000").css("background-color", "#FAAF16");
    delete t.s[i];
    t.s.push(x);
    // increment i
    i++;
}, 1000);

var start = timer.start();

You will notice here that I've used a constructor called DeltaTimer. This constructor is defined in this gist. It allows you to control your animations precisely using start and stop functions. The render function which is passed is given a time argument which is a Date. The expression time - start gives the exact time when the function was called (e.g. 4, 1000, 2000, ...).

The advantage of using DeltaTimer over setTimeout or setInterval is:

  1. It corrects itself. This means that animations are smoother and there's less lag.
  2. The animation can be controlled by starting and stopping the timer.
  3. The exact time of the function call is passed to the function. This helps in keeping track of which frame is being rendered, where should the sprite be rendered, etc.
  4. The logic for animation is separated from the logic of timing control. Thus code is more cohesive and more loosely coupled.

You can read my other answers regarding delta timing here, here and here.

Edit 1: That's actually pretty simple. We simply shift out the first element of the array, process it and then push it back at the end. Here's the logic:

function loopIterate(array, callback, interval) {
    var timer = new DeltaTimer(function (time) {
        var element = array.shift();
        callback(element, time - start);
        array.push(element);
    }, interval);

    var start = timer.start();
};

Now we can create an array and loop through it as follows:

var body = document.body;

loopIterate([1, 2, 3], function (element, time) {
    body.innerHTML += element + ": " + time + "<br/>";
}, 1000);

You can see the output here: http://jsfiddle.net/aGQfr/

Edit 2: Oops, I found a problem. From what I understand you want to process the next element a certain amount of time after the current element is finished processing. My delta timing script doesn't do that. It only executes functions at fixed intervals of time.

So, you don't need delta timing at all. You need to call setTimeout after each element has been processed:

function loopIterate(array, callback, interval) {
    var start = + new Date;
    process();

    function process() {
        var element = array.shift();
        callback(element, new Date - start);
        array.push(element);

        setTimeout(process, interval);
    }
};

After that just create an array and loop through it as follows:

loopIterate([1, 2, 3], function (element, time) {
    alert(element);
}, 1000);

You can see the demo here (note that your browser may not like it): http://jsfiddle.net/aGQfr/1/

Edit 3: You may also combined methods one and two so that you have a script which:

  1. Waits for the processing to finish before adding the next element to process to the event queue.
  2. Can be controlled using a start and stop function.
  3. Gives the exact time the callback is called.
  4. Separates processing from timing control.

We'll create a constructor function called LoopIterator which returns an iterator object with start and stop methods:

function LoopIterator(array, callback, interval) {
    var start, iterate, timeout;

    this.start = function () {
        if (!iterate) {
            start = + new Date;
            iterate = true;
            loop();
        }
    };

    this.stop = function () {
        if (iterate) {
            clearTimeout(timeout);
            iterate = false;
        }
    };

    function loop() {
        var element = array.shift();
        callback(element, new Date - start);
        array.push(element);

        if (iterate) timeout = setTimeout(loop, interval);
    }
}

Now we can create and start a new iterator as follows:

var iterator = new LoopIterator([1, 2, 3], function (element, time) {
    alert(element);
}, 3000);

iterator.start();

If you wish you may even stop and start the iterator when the mouse moves over an element or out of an element respectively:

var div = document.getElementsByTagName("div")[0];
div.addEventListener("mouseout", iterator.start, false);
div.addEventListener("mouseover", iterator.stop, false);

When stopped the iterator's state is preserved and when started again it continues from where it left off.

You may see the demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/PEcUG/

Edit 4: So you want to create a simple slider? Let's start with the HTML, then the CSS and then the JavaScript.

The HTML:

<div class="slider">
    <div class="slide">Slide 1</div>
    <div class="slide">Slide 2</div>
    <div class="slide">Slide 3</div>
</div>

We have a div element with a class called slider (because there may be more than one slider on the page). Each slider has zero or more div elements with the class slide. Each slide may have arbitrary content. The slider will also have buttons, but we don't include this in the HTML as it will be generated automatically by JavaScript. No redundancy. Also note that none of the slides are manually numbered. Everything is handled by JavaScript.

The CSS:

.slide {
    background-color: #EEEEEE;
    -moz-border-radius: 0.25em;
    -webkit-border-radius: 0.25em;
    border-radius: 0.25em;
    display: none;
    padding: 1em;
}

.slider-button {
    background-color: #CCCCCC;
    -moz-border-radius: 0.25em;
    -webkit-border-radius: 0.25em;
    border-radius: 0.25em;
    cursor: pointer;
    float: right;
    height: 1.25em;
    margin: 0.5em;
    width: 1.25em;
}

You may supply arbitrary CSS to suit your taste. An important point however is that .slide must have display: none; because the slides must initially be hidden. Also .slider-button must have float: right;. This is important as elements floated to the right have their order reversed. Thus the first button is actually the last button. This must be handled correctly by JavaScript so don't change it unless you know what you're doing.

The JavaScript:

Alright, I'll explain this bottom up:

window.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function () {
    var sliders = document.querySelectorAll(".slider");
    var length = sliders.length;

    for (var i = 0; i < length; i++)
        new Slider(sliders[i], 2000);
}, false);

Here Slider is a constructor function which initializes and starts the slider element it passed. It accepts the time interval between two slides as the second argument. Here's the code for Slider:

function Slider(slider, interval) {
    var slides = slider.querySelectorAll(".slide");
    var iterate, start, timeout, delay = interval;
    slides = Array.prototype.slice.call(slides);
    var buttons = [], numbers = [], goto = [];
    var length = slides.length;

    for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        var button = document.createElement("div");
        button.setAttribute("class", "slider-button");
        slider.appendChild(button);
        buttons.unshift(button);
        numbers.push(i + 1);

        var handler = getHandler(length - i);
        button.addEventListener("click", handler, false);
        goto.unshift(handler);
    }

    this.goto = function (index) {
        var gotoSlide = goto[index];
        if (typeof gotoSlide === "function")
            gotoSlide();
    };

    slider.addEventListener("mouseover", stop, false);
    slider.addEventListener("mouseout", start, false);

    this.start = start;
    this.stop = stop;

    showSlide();
    start();

    function start() {
        if (!iterate) {
            iterate = true;
            start = + new Date;
            timeout = setTimeout(loop, delay);
        }
    }

    function stop() {
        if (iterate) {
            iterate = false;
            clearTimeout(timeout);
            delay = interval - new Date + start;
        }
    }

    function loop() {
        hideSlide();
        slideSlider();
        showSlide();

        if (iterate) {
            start = + new Date;
            timeout = setTimeout(loop, interval);
        }
    }

    function hideSlide() {
        slides[0].style.display = "none";
        buttons[0].style.backgroundColor = "#CCCCCC";
    }

    function slideSlider() {
        slides.push(slides.shift());
        buttons.push(buttons.shift());
        numbers.push(numbers.shift());
    }

    function showSlide() {
        slides[0].style.display = "block";
        buttons[0].style.backgroundColor = "#FAAF16";
    }

    function getHandler(number) {
        return function () {
            hideSlide();
            while (numbers[0] !== number) slideSlider();
            showSlide();
        };
    }
}

The code is pretty self-explanatory. Every instance of Slider has a start, stop and goto method for finer control. The goto method takes a slide index number. For n slides the indices range from 0 to n - 1. That's it.

The demo of the slider is here: http://jsfiddle.net/SyTFZ/4/

share|improve this answer
    
Does this only work for animations? I am looking for a timer that will work for any logic. Please see edits, I hope I have made this more clear. –  Dan Kanze Oct 17 '12 at 3:50
1  
It works for absolutely anything. It's just like setInterval, only better. –  Aadit M Shah Oct 17 '12 at 3:53
1  
I edited my answer and I added a demo. Hope that helps. –  Aadit M Shah Oct 17 '12 at 6:00
1  
No problem. I've updated my answer if you're interested. My first update executes the function at intervals 0, 1000, 2000, etc. My second update executes the function at 0, then waits till it's finished processing, then executes the function after 1000 ms, then waits again, etc. You decide which one you wish to use. –  Aadit M Shah Oct 17 '12 at 6:24
1  
The iterator starts automatically. If you move it into the pink box then it stops. If you move it out then it starts from where it left off. Hope that helps. –  Aadit M Shah Oct 17 '12 at 14:44

OK, now that you've completely simplified the question, here's a generic array iterator function that puts a delay between the iteration of each element of the array and it cycles forever until the callback function returns false:

function iterateArrayWithDelay(arr, delay, fn) {
    var index = 0;

    function next() {
        // protect against empty array
        if (!arr.length) {
            return;
        }

        // see if we need to wrap the index
        if (index >= arr.length) {
            index = 0;
        }

        // call the callback
        if (fn(arr[index], arr, index) === false) {
            // stop iterating
            return;
        }

        ++index;

        // schedule next iteration
        setTimeout(next, delay);
    }
    // start the iteration
    next();
}

And, for your example, you would use it like this:

iterateArrayWithDelay(s, 1000, myFunction);

Where you define myFunction to be a callback function that processes each element. The callback is passed three items:

myFunction(item, array, i){
    // your code here to process item
}

.delay() only works with jQuery methods that use the animation queue. In your code example, the .delay('1000') isn't doing anything since there are no jQuery animation methods after it on the same object.

As for memory leaks, it's hard to follow the overall context of what you're doing because we can't see the lifetime of the object represented by this and its properties. This sequence looks pretty odd:

var x = t.s[i];
...
delete t.s[i];
t.s.push(x);

In particular, I don't see how the delete statement is actually doing anything because you still have a reference to the contents in x so nothing will be garbage collected. Further, delete in javascript is used the get rid of an object property, not for freeing up an object or for removing an array element. To free up an object, you have to get rid of all references to that object (setting them to some other value so they no longer contain the reference or letting them go out of scope). Thus, since you're never getting rid of the reference to whatever is in t.s[i], nothing is getting freed.


Your use of setTimeout() is not causing recursion. When you call setTimeout(), it sets a timer and puts a function reference into a data structure that is associated with that timer. Then, the calling function continues to run and finishes it's execution. Thus, it's done executing before the setTimeout() fires and calls it again. So, it's not actually recursion. It's a bunch of sequential function calls, separated by a time interval and one finishes before the next can run (because javascript is single threaded and because the timer is set for the future).

share|improve this answer
    
I was more worried about if the that setTimeout executes recursively without delay, but it's queing the function in a stack. So for example, s() runs 3 times in 3 ms but que's the execution of s() at 1001ms,1002ms,1003ms. –  Dan Kanze Oct 17 '12 at 3:21
    
@DanKanze - I added info about the setTimeout() and recursion. –  jfriend00 Oct 17 '12 at 3:24
    
Right, thanks for the update and this is exactly what I don't want. What I need is something to delay the functions of the actions im taking inside the function as described above. –  Dan Kanze Oct 17 '12 at 3:27
    
@DanKanze - we can't help with a better solution without a description of what you're really trying to accomplish. For anything other than a jQuery animation, you use setTimeout() to introduce a time delay. Because javascript is single threaded and does not let you wait inside the thread of execution, you have to break each chunk of execution into a function that can be called form setTimeout(). I thought that's what you were doing in your code so I'm not sure why you say it's not doing what you want. Please back up and describe the overall thing you're trying to solve. –  jfriend00 Oct 17 '12 at 3:31
    
@DanKanze - If we understood what you're really trying to do, I'm sure we could suggest much cleaner code. –  jfriend00 Oct 17 '12 at 3:32

The plugin jquery-timing can help you getting this effect done with very short code. There is already an example with waiting on mouseover.

I am sure this can be adapted to your use case, too:

function noHover() {
   return this.is(':hover') ? this.wait('mouseleave') : this;
}

$('.images').repeat().each($).fadeIn($).wait(1000).wait(noHover).fadeOut($);
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