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I have deviced a procedure to find nth working day without using loops.

Please bring around your suggesstions over this -

Algorithm to manipulate working days -

Problem: Find the date of nth working day from any particular day.

Solution:

  1. Normalize to closest Monday -

    If today(or the initial day) happens to be something other than monday, bring the day to the closest monday by simple addition or subtraction.
    

    eg: Initial Day - 17, Oct. This happens to be wednesday. So normalize this no monday by going 2 dates down. Now name this 2 dates, the initial normalization factor.

  2. Add the number of working days + week ends that fall in these weeks.

    eg: to add 10 working days, we need to add 12 days. Since 10 days has 1 week that includes only 1 saturday and 1 sunday. this is because, we are normalizing to nearest monday.

  3. Amortizing back -

    Now from the end date add the initial normalization factor (for negative initial normalization) and another constant factor (say, k). Or add 1 if the initial normalization is obtained from a Friday, which happens to be +3. If start date falls on Saturday and sunday , treat as monday. so no amortization required at this step.

    eg: Say if initial normalization is from wednesday, the intial normalization factor is -2. Hence add 2 to the end date and a constant k.

    The constant k is either 2 or 0. 
    

Constant definition -

    If initial normalization factor is -3, then add 2 to the resulting date if the day before amortization is (wed,thu,fri) 
    If initial normalization factor is -2, then add 2 to the resulting date if the day before amortization is (thu,fri) 
    If initial normalization factor is -1, then add 2 to the resulting date if the day before amortization is (fri) 

Example -

   Find the 15th working day from Oct,17 (wednesday).

Step 1 -

initial normalization = -2 now start date is Oct,15 (monday).

Step 2 -

add 15 working days -

15 days => 2 weeks
    weekends = 2 (2 sat, 2 sun)

    so add 15 + 4 = 19 days to Oct, 15 monday.

    end_date = 2, nov, Friday

Step 3a -

end_date = end_date + initial normalization = 4, nov sunday

Step 3b -

end_date = end_date + constant_factor = 4, nov, sunday + 2 = 6, nov (Tuesday)

Cross Verfication -

 Add 15th working day to Oct, 17 wednesday

 Oct,17 + 3 (Oct 17,18,19) + 5 (Oct 22-26) + 5 (Oct 29 - Nov 2)  + 2 (Nov 5, Nov 6)

 Now the answer is 6, Nov, Tuesday.

I have verified with a few cases. Please share your suggesstions.

Larsen.

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closed as not a real question by Mac, Nishant, Ian Mercer, delnan, Márton Molnár Oct 21 '12 at 11:49

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
It seems like you've already solved your problem; good job! –  mfrankli Oct 17 '12 at 4:53
1  
To expand on @mfrankli's comment: Stack Overflow is a question and answer site. Where's your question? –  Mac Oct 17 '12 at 4:58
    
The algorithm doesn't accounts for the holidays (non working days) that lie on days other than sat and sunday....for example christmas, easter etc –  Seasoned Oct 17 '12 at 5:05
    
and the question is...? –  Barranka Oct 17 '12 at 5:17
    
@Seasoned agree with you... but you have to maintain a separate holiday calender/catelog instead of going through such algorithms... –  Karthikeyan Arumugam Oct 17 '12 at 6:48

2 Answers 2

To start with, its a nice algorithm, i have doubts about boundary conditions though: for example, what if i need to find the 0th working day from today's date:

Step 1 -

initial normalization = -2 now start date is Oct,15 (monday).

Step 2 -

add 0 working days -

0 days => 0 weeks
    weekends = 0
    so add 0 + 0 = 0 days to Oct, 15 monday.

    end_date = 15, oct, monday

Step 3a -

end_date = end_date + initial normalization = 17, oct wednesday

Step 3b -

end_date = end_date + constant_factor = 17, Oct wednesday or 19,oct friday based on whether constant factor is 0 or 2 as it be only one of these values.

Now lets repeat the steps for finding the 1st working day from today:

Step 1 -

initial normalization = -2 now start date is Oct,15 (monday).

Step 2 -

add 1 working days -

1 days => 0 weeks
    weekends = 0
    so add 1 + 0 = 1 days to Oct, 15 monday.

    end_date = 15, oct, monday

Step 3a -

end_date = end_date + initial normalization = 17, oct wednesday

Step 3b -

end_date = end_date + constant_factor = 17, Oct wednesday or 19,oct friday based on whether constant factor is 0 or 2 as it be only one of these values.

Did you notice, algorithm gives the same end result for 0 and 1. May be thats not an issue if t defined beforehand that 0 working days and 1 working days are considered as same scenario, but ideally they should be giving different results.

I would also suggest you to consider the negative test cases, like what if i need to find -6th working day from today, will your alforithm give me a date in past rightfully?

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constant factor should not be applied for the case considered with 0 working days because the end date before amortization comes to be Wednesday and initial normalization is 2. V(Wednesday|Thursday|Friday,3) = 2 V(Thursday|Friday,2) = 2 V(Friday,1) = 2. generically, V(day of week, initial normalization) = 2 –  Larsen Oct 17 '12 at 16:04
    
I don't think we get the same answer for 0 WD and 1 WD. –  Larsen Oct 17 '12 at 16:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Lets consider 0th working day from today (17/10, wed).

Step 1 -

 start_date = 17/10 wed
 normalized date = 15/10 mon

Step 2 -

end_date = normalized date + working days = 15/10 mon + 0 = 15/10 mon

Step 3 -

  amortized_back = end_date_before_amortization + normalization factor
                 = 15/10 + (+2) = 17/10 wed

  since the end_date_before_amortization falls on monday and initial normalization is 2, constant factor = 0.

  hence, end_date = 17/10 wed.

now case 2, 1st working day from today.

Step 1 -

 start_date = 17/10 wed
 normalized date = 15/10 mon

Step 2 -

end_date = normalized date + working days = 15/10 mon + 1 = 16/10 tue Step 3 -

 amortized_back = end_date_before_amortization + normalization factor
                 = 16/10 + (+2) = 18/10 thu.

  since the end_date_before_amortization falls on tuesday and initial normalization is 2, constant factor = 0.

  hence, end_date = 18/10 thu.

Looks to be working for 0th and 1st WD.

share|improve this answer
    
In your soultion you have calculated 15 oct + 1 working days to be 16 oct, while in the original question you calculated 15 oct + 19 working days to be 2 nov, if 15+1 = 16 oct, then 15+19 working days should be 3rd nov and not 2nd nov. –  Seasoned Oct 18 '12 at 6:59
    
Got it. In the first case the assumption was to include the current day as 1 working day. In the above solution I have missed to consider the current day as 1st working day. But I guess this discrepancy shouldn't affect logic on normalization and amortizing back. And this logic is not applicable for reverse calculation. –  Larsen Oct 18 '12 at 9:13
    
Good...yes, that minor assumption should not affect the alforithm in general. Well, once again, congartulations on writing this algo....all the best for future –  Seasoned Oct 18 '12 at 10:26

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