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Why are all destructors, ~D(),~C(),~B(),~A() being called in the example below?

There is only one virtual destructor: that of A.

Here is the code:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
  virtual ~A()
  {
    cout<<"destruct A\n";
  }

};
class B:public A
{
public:
  ~B()
  {
  cout<<"destruct B\n"; 
  }
};
class C:public B
{
public:
  ~C()
  {
    cout<<"destruct C\n";
  }
};
class D:public C
{
public:
   ~D()
   {
     cout<<"destruct D\n"; 
   }
};

int main()
{
    A* ptr = new D();
    delete ptr;
    return 0;
}
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1  
Because that is what the rules of the language say should happen. –  juanchopanza Oct 17 '12 at 5:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Once A's destructor is declared virtual, the destructors of all derived classes are also virtual, even if they aren't explicitly declared as such.. So the behaviour you see is exactly what is expected

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1  
@spin_eight a D is accessed via a pointer to A, which is what the delete is called on. If A's destructor weren't virtual, only ~A() would be called. You can easily check for yourself. –  juanchopanza Oct 17 '12 at 5:52
    
Yes, thank you! –  spin_eight Oct 17 '12 at 6:04

The destruction order in derived objects goes in exactly the reverse order of construction: first the destructors of the most derived classes are called and then the destructor of the base classes.

A destructor can be defined as virtual or even pure virtual. You would use a virtual destructor if you ever expect a derived class to be destroyed through a pointer to the base class. This will ensure that the destructor of the most derived classes will get called:

A* b1 = new B;//if A has a virtual destructor
delete b1;//invokes B's destructor and then A's

A* b1 = new B;//if A has no virtual destructor
    delete b1;//invokes A's destructor ONLY

If A does not have a virtual destructor, deleting b1 through a pointer of type A will merely invoke A's destructor. To enforce the calling of B's destructor in this case we must have specified A's destructor as virtual:

virtual ~A();

REFERENCE

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"even pure virtual" - when to prevent run time errors you have to create body for pure virtual destructor in order to allocate address in virtual table for that destructor, not just nullptr –  spin_eight Oct 17 '12 at 6:06

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