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I've following piece of code which implements the singleton class (Double-Check Locking)

public sealed class Plugin
{
    #region Private Fields

    private static volatile Plugin _instance;
    private static object syncRoot = new Object();

    private Dictionary<int, string> myMap;

    #endregion

    private Plugin()
    {
        myMap = MapInit(GetMainModuleName());
    }

    static Plugin()
    { }

    public static Plugin Instance
    {
        get 
        {
            if (_instance == null) 
            {
                lock (syncRoot) 
                {
                   if (_instance == null)
                       _instance = new Plugin();
                }
            }

            return _instance;
        }
    }
}

The singleton instance is constructed properly in the debug mode, and everything seems to be working fine. But in the release mode, the instance is returned before it is constructed properly i.e., the myMap is not initialized.

Also it is to be noted that following code takes around 10 -15 secs to be executed completely in debug mode

myMap = MapInit(GetMainModuleName());

Is this the problem with some compiler optimization? Please help

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2  
This sounds unlikely - how are you diagnosing this, exactly? And why are you using DCL at all, given the simpler and less fragile alternatives? (See csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx) –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '12 at 5:48
    
I've used DCL because , the above singleton class is used in multi-threaded environment. And I've diagnosed this problem by attaching to the process when it is running –  user1447725 Oct 17 '12 at 5:55
    
That's not a reason to use DCL - that's a reason to use any of the simple thread-safe approaches. Saying you've attached to the process doesn't really tell us much - what exactly are you observing? Have you added any logging to show what's going on? –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '12 at 5:58
    
Unfortunately, there's no logging for this. But i can add one. And i'll explain how i diagnosed, If the application is left to run on its own, the map will not initialized and hence the count of items in the map is zero but if i debug it going one step at a time the map gets initialized with some items in it. Is there anything else i can do to diagnose the problem more accurately? –  user1447725 Oct 17 '12 at 6:15
    
Well logging would be the first step. There are numerous explanations which could be relevant here, including a race condition within the initialization itself. If you can produce a short but complete program demonstrating the problem, that will help. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '12 at 6:18

2 Answers 2

You don't need Singleton, in fact you don't do Singleton. Why is people doing singleton these days?

Look, this simply works:

public sealed class Plugin
{
    private static readonly Plugin _instance;
    private /*readonly?*/ Dictionary<int, string> myMap;

    private Plugin()
    {
        myMap = MapInit(GetMainModuleName());
    }

    static Plugin()
    {
        _instance = new Plugin();
    }

    public static Plugin Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return _instance;
        }
    }
}

Static constructors are guaranteed to run only once per application domain, this is part of the C# language specification.


To address your question, there is a problem with the double check pattern as you has shown it doesn't work with compiler optimization when the machine has more than one thread in hardware. The reason for this is that...

[from http://blogs.msdn.com/b/brada/archive/2004/05/12/130935.aspx ]

the memory model allows for non-volatile reads\writes to be reordered as long as that change can not be noticed from the point of view of a single thread.

Even with volatile. The volatile keyword is telling the compiler that writing to the field _instance must be done after reading the field _instance. And yet nothing prevents it from initilizing the new Plugin object before reading the value of _instance in first place.

Aside from that you said you are facing another problem:

the instance is returned before it is constructed properly

Then you need to wait for the initialization to complete, and not just check if it has started. Aparently the field _instance has been set before the constructor of the class Plugin ends, if that is the case, it means that you need to wait until its complete. Also if have some asynchonous calls there you may need to add a "ready" property or some other way to wait [It would be your fault to allow an object to be in an invalid state].

*: This is often solved introducing a temporal variable, to which you set the new instance and the you assing that variable to your field. That technique also allows to make the field non-volatile by adding a memory barrier... and yet, it increases the risk of having your constructor run more than once. So, I've skipped all that.

To address both problems you can use this combination of Interlocked and ManualResetEvent [Without knowing the internals of the constructor I doubt I can do more]:

public sealed class Plugin
{
    private static readonly Plugin _instance;
    private static int _initializing;
    private static ManualReserEvent _done;
    private Dictionary<int, string> myMap;

    private Plugin()
    {
        myMap = MapInit(GetMainModuleName());
    }

    static Plugin()
    {
        _done = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    }

    public static Plugin Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (Interlocked.CompareExchance(ref _initializing, 1, 0) == 0)
            {
                _instance = new Plugin();
                _done.Set();
            }
            else
            {
                _done.WaitOne();
            }
            return _instance;
        }
    }
}

Even though... just use the static constructor.

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Thanks for the valuable suggestion, i'll look through the dificiencies in my code. –  user1447725 Oct 22 '12 at 11:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, here's the actual problem which may sound naive. The dll with the above code was loaded into the main application which had a exe.config which was invalid. And since my dll had seperate dll.config(which is valid) the application was working fine when run through the debugger, but when run in deployment enviroment(without debugger attached), it was encountering the invalid config file exception.

I've made the main exe.config as valid config file and it works now.

So basically , the solution is as naive as checking if there is exception in the construction process.

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