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Suppose some situations exist where you would like to increment and decrement values in the same for loop. In this set of situations, there are some cases where you can "cheat" this by taking advantage of the nature of the situation -- for example, reversing a string.

Because of the nature of building strings, we don't really have to manipulate the iterate or add an additional counter:

public static void stringReversal(){
    String str = "Banana";
    String forwardStr = new String();
    String backwardStr = new String();

    for(int i = str.length()-1; i >= 0; i--){
        forwardStr = str.charAt(i)+forwardStr;
        backwardStr = backwardStr+str.charAt(i);
    }

    System.out.println("Forward String:  "+forwardStr);
    System.out.println("Backward String: "+backwardStr);   
}

However, suppose a different case exists where we just want to print a decremented value, from the initial value to 0, and an incremented value, from 0 to the initial value.

public static void incrementAndDecrement(){

   int counter = 0;

   for(int i = 10; i >= 0; i--){
       System.out.println(i);
       System.out.println(counter);
       counter++;
   } 
}

This works well enough, but having to create a second counter to increment seems messy. Are there any mathematical tricks or tricks involving the for loop that could be used that would make counter redundant?

share|improve this question
1  
What's wrong with simple arithmetic? 10 - i? –  Alexis King Oct 17 '12 at 6:03
    
@JakeKing Sleep deprivation, I believe. –  Hyper Anthony Oct 17 '12 at 6:05
2  
Happens to the best of us. –  Alexis King Oct 17 '12 at 6:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well it looks like you just want:

for(int i = 10; i >= 0; i--){
    System.out.println(i);
    System.out.println(10 - i);
} 

Is that the case? Personally I'd normally write this as an increasing loop, as I find it easier to think about that:

for (int i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
    System.out.println(10 - i);
    System.out.println(i);
} 

Note that your string example is really inefficient, by the way - far more so than introducing an extra variable. Given that you know the lengths involved to start with, you can just start with two char[] of the right size, and populate the right index each time. Then create a string from each afterwards. Again, I'd do this with an increasing loop:

char[] forwardChars = new char[str.length()];
char[] reverseChars = new char[str.length()];
for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
    forwardChars[i] = str.charAt(i);
    reverseChars[reverseChars.length - i - 1] = str.charAt(i);
}
String forwardString = new String(forwardChars);
String reverseString = new String(reverseChars);

(Of course forwardString will just be equal to str in this case anyway...)

share|improve this answer
2  
Holy crap, Jon Skeet! –  Alexis King Oct 17 '12 at 6:04
1  
and now the upvoting starts!! ;-) –  Arham Oct 17 '12 at 6:08
    
I was actually hoping this would get a discussion started about efficiency in these sorts of problems, but I wasn't sure how to work that into the question. Thanks for taking the extra step to elaborate on both examples! –  Hyper Anthony Oct 17 '12 at 6:09

You can have multiple variables and incrementers in your for loop.

           for(int i = 10, j = 0; i >= 0; i--, j++){
           System.out.println(i);
           System.out.println(j);
       } 
share|improve this answer
    
how is that different from adding a counter variable?...the question is to reduce the number of variables. –  Arham Oct 17 '12 at 6:09
    
It's not. He just requested it to be less "messy" and involving the for loop, so I figured this might be what he is looking for. :) –  gnunaes Oct 17 '12 at 6:10
    
+1 for expanding my knowledge on the topic. It is indeed less "messy" as it keeps everything in the loop, and as such is within the bounds of my question. –  Hyper Anthony Oct 17 '12 at 6:19

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