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Can anybody please tell why would this query take minutes to execute?

Select  
   d.DocumentID, d.IsReEfiled, d.IGroupID, d.ITypeID, d.RecordingDateTime, 
   d.IDate, d.InstrumentID, d.DocumentStatusID,ig.Abbreviation as IGroupAbbreviation, 
   u.Username, j.JDAbbreviation, inf.DocumentName,
   it.Abbreviation as ITypeAbbreviation, d.DocumentDate, 
   ds.Abbreviation as DocumentStatusAbbreviation 
From Documents d 
Inner Join IGroupes ig On d.IGroupID = ig.IGroupID 
Left Join ITypes it On d.ITypeID = it.ITypeID 
Left Join Users u On u.UserID = d.UserID 
Left Join DocumentStatuses ds On d.DocumentStatusID = ds.DocumentStatusID 
Left Join InstrumentFiles inf On d.DocumentID = inf.DocumentID                         
Inner Join Jurisdictions j on j.JurisdictionID = d.JurisdictionID 
Where 
    d.DocumentID IN
      (SELECT DocumentID 
       FROM (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (Order By DocumentID desc) peta_rn, peta_query.* 
             From (Select d.DocumentID
                   From Documents d) as peta_query) peta_paged 
       WHERE peta_rn > 92000 AND peta_rn <= 92100)

The subquery:

SELECT DocumentID 
FROM (SELECT 
         ROW_NUMBER() OVER (Order By DocumentID desc) peta_rn, peta_query.* 
      FROM
         (SELECT d.DocumentID
          FROM Documents d) as peta_query) peta_paged 
WHERE peta_rn > 92000 AND peta_rn <= 92100

itself takes 0 seconds but the whole query takes minutes and I don't even have that many Joins. It's hardly 6-7 joins which shouldn't create so much problems in my opinion as these all foreign keys have indexes on them. Can anybody suggest what could be the problem?

Edit:

This is awesome. See this query which executes in 0 seconds:

Select  d.DocumentID, d.IsReEfiled, d.IGroupID, d.ITypeID, d.RecordingDateTime, 
        d.IDate, d.InstrumentID, d.DocumentStatusID, u.Username, j.JDAbbreviation, inf.DocumentName,
        it.Abbreviation as ITypeAbbreviation, d.DocumentDate, ds.Abbreviation as DocumentStatusAbbreviation 
            From Documents d 
                Inner Join IGroupes ig On d.IGroupID = ig.IGroupID 
                Left Join ITypes it On d.ITypeID = it.ITypeID 
                Left Join Users u On u.UserID = d.UserID  
                Left Join DocumentStatuses ds On d.DocumentStatusID = ds.DocumentStatusID 
                Left Join InstrumentFiles inf On d.DocumentID = inf.DocumentID                         
                Inner Join Jurisdictions j on j.JurisdictionID = d.JurisdictionID 
                    Where d.DocumentID IN
                        (
                            SELECT DocumentID FROM (SELECT 
                                ROW_NUMBER() OVER (Order By DocumentID desc) peta_rn, peta_query.* From 
                                (
                                        Select   d.DocumentID
                                                From Documents d 

                                ) as peta_query) peta_paged WHERE peta_rn>92000 AND peta_rn<=92100
                        )

As you can see it just removes ig.Abbreviation IGroupAbbreviation, from the query. As soon as I put ig.Abbreviation IGroupAbbreviation, it starts taking minutes. Isn't this the heights of ridiculousness? What do you think would cause this?

Edit 2:

Some more weirdness. Changing Inner Join IGroupes ig to Left Join IGroupes ig executes the query in 0 seconds. Can you please suggest why would Inner Join take up minutes? Is this my problem is this some bug in SQL server? Only thing left now is to bang my head against wall. I have wasted more than 4 hours.

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1  
You should check if you have appropriate indices on ig table... – Ivan G Oct 17 '12 at 6:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this version of your query:

SELECT  DocumentID 
INTO    #temp
FROM    (
        SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (Order By DocumentID desc) peta_rn
                , d2.DocumentID
        FROM    Documents d2 
        ) peta_paged
WHERE   peta_rn > 92000 AND peta_rn <= 92100

Select  d.DocumentID, d.IsReEfiled, d.IGroupID, d.ITypeID, d.RecordingDateTime, 
        d.IDate, d.InstrumentID, d.DocumentStatusID,ig.Abbreviation as IGroupAbbreviation, u.Username, j.JDAbbreviation, inf.DocumentName,
        it.Abbreviation as ITypeAbbreviation, d.DocumentDate, ds.Abbreviation as DocumentStatusAbbreviation 
            From Documents d 
                Inner Join IGroupes ig On d.IGroupID = ig.IGroupID 
                Left Join ITypes it On d.ITypeID = it.ITypeID 
                Left Join Users u On u.UserID = d.UserID 
                Left Join DocumentStatuses ds On d.DocumentStatusID = ds.DocumentStatusID 
                Left Join InstrumentFiles inf On d.DocumentID = inf.DocumentID                         
                Inner Join Jurisdictions j on j.JurisdictionID = d.JurisdictionID 
                INNER JOIN #temp ON d.DocumentID = #temp.DocumentID
share|improve this answer

I can see only one issue with this. depending on how many records there are in users table this line will return all of the users: Left Join Users u On u.UserID = d.UserID

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Why would it return all of the users? I am doing Documents Left Join Users not Users Left Join Documents. By the way changing that to Inner Join has no effect. – Jack Oct 17 '12 at 6:27

This looks like a case where the SQL Server query optimiser cannot evaluate all the possible choices before it times out and ends up choosing a crappy execution plan. By re-running the query to give the optimiser another shot, or by changing it enough so that it can come up with a good plan is what has resulted in your query subsequently running in no time at all.

I think your best bet is to look at the execution plan to see where all the time is being spent and then look at either changing your query, e.g. using query hints, or to change your db, e.g. adding appropriate indexes.

This post has some good info on how SQL Server works.

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