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Java's e.printStackTrace() doesn't print all the details of the inner exception's stack trace.

Is there a ready way to generate the complete stack trace in string form? (besides formatting it myself)

Edit

I just found out what printStackTrace() does - apparently the stack frames it filters out are exactly the ones common to the inner exception and the outer one. So in fact it is rather what I want, and not the 'full' stack trace.

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How do you mean - inner exception's stack trace? Is a caught exception being propagated in another exception? –  Everyone Aug 18 '09 at 10:10
    
Something that's produces by a catch ... throw new Exception("foo", e) –  ripper234 Aug 18 '09 at 11:27
    
I just found out what printStackTrace() does - apparently the stack frames it filters out are exactly the ones common to the inner exception and the outer one. So in fact it is rather what I want, and not the 'full' stack trace. –  ripper234 Aug 18 '09 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

I suggest that you use the ExceptionUtils class from Apache Commons lang, which provides useful method for that.

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Actually, getFullStacktrace() still doesn't print the inner stack trace. –  ripper234 Aug 18 '09 at 11:25
    
Unfortunately, there are no printFullStacktrace() method, but you can do System.err.println(getFullStacktrace()); –  romaintaz Aug 18 '09 at 11:32
    
Link is down... –  Pacerier Feb 11 '12 at 20:20
    
@Pacerier edited (regarding Commons Lang3). –  romaintaz Feb 11 '12 at 22:08
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I ended up rolling my own (I took the implementation of Throwable.printStackTrace() and tweaked it a bit):

public static String joinStackTrace(Throwable e) {
    StringWriter writer = null;
    try {
        writer = new StringWriter();
        joinStackTrace(e, writer);
        return writer.toString();
    }
    finally {
        if (writer != null)
            try {
                writer.close();
            } catch (IOException e1) {
                // ignore
            }
    }
}

public static void joinStackTrace(Throwable e, StringWriter writer) {
    PrintWriter printer = null;
    try {
        printer = new PrintWriter(writer);

        while (e != null) {

            printer.println(e);
            StackTraceElement[] trace = e.getStackTrace();
            for (int i = 0; i < trace.length; i++)
                printer.println("\tat " + trace[i]);

            e = e.getCause();
            if (e != null)
                printer.println("Caused by:\r\n");
        }
    }
    finally {
        if (printer != null)
            printer.close();
    }
}
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Yes you can use the StackTraceElement class returned by Throwable.getStackTrace() and find the details.

From the API:

The last element of the array (assuming the array's length is non-zero) represents the bottom of the stack, which is the first method invocation in the sequence.

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How is this not 'formatting it myself' ? –  ripper234 Aug 18 '09 at 9:46
    
yes, this option does not address the formatting part. –  techzen Aug 18 '09 at 10:20

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