Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

AngularJS noob here, on my path to the Angular Enlightenment :)

Here's the situation:

I have implemented a service 'AudioPlayer' inside my module 'app' and registered like so:

 app.service('AudioPlayer', function($rootScope) {

     // ...

     this.next = function () {
         // loads the next track in the playlist
         this.loadTrack(playlist[++playIndex]);     
     };

     this.loadTrack = function(track) {
         // ... loads the track and plays it
         // broadcast 'trackLoaded' event when done
         $rootScope.$broadcast('trackLoaded', track); 
     };
 }

and here's the 'receiver' controller (mostly for UI / presentation logic)

app.controller('PlayerCtrl', function PlayerCtrl($scope, AudioPlayer) {


    // AudioPlayer broadcasts the event when the track is loaded

    $scope.$on('trackLoaded', function(event, track) {
        // assign the loaded track as the 'current' 
        $scope.current = track;
    });

    $scope.next = function() {
        AudioPlayer.next();
    };
}

in my views I show the current track info like so:

<div ng-controller="PlayerCtrl">
    <button ng-click="next()"></button>
    // ...
    <p id="info">{{current.title}} by {{current.author}}</p>
</div>

the next() method is defined in the PlayerCtrl, and it simply invokes the same method on the AudioPlayer service.

The problem

This works fine when there is a manual interaction (ie when I click on the next() button) - the flow is the following:

  1. PlayerCtrl intercepts the click and fires its own next() method
  2. which in turn fires the AudioPlayer.next() method
  3. which seeks the next track in the playlist and calls the loadTrack() method
  4. loadTrack() $broadcasts the 'trackLoaded' event (sending out the track itself with it)
  5. the PlayerCtrl listens the broadcast event and assigns the track to the current object
  6. the view updates correctly, showing the current.title and current.author info

However, when the next() method is called from within the AudioService in the 'background' (ie, when the track is over), all the steps from 1 to 5 do happen, but the view doesn't get notified of the change in the PlayerCtrl's 'current' object.

I can see clearly the new track object being assigned in the PlayerCtrl, but it's as if the view doesn't get notified of the change. I'm a noob, and I'm not sure if this is of any help, but what I've tried is adding a $watch expression in the PlayerCtrl

$scope.$watch('current', function(newVal, oldVal) {
    console.log('Current changed');
})

which gets printed out only during the 'manual' interactions...

Again, like I said, if I add a console.log(current) in the $on listener like so:

$scope.$on('trackLoaded', function(event, track) {
    $scope.current = track;
    console.log($scope.current);
});

this gets printed correctly at all times.

What am I doing wrong?

(ps I'm using AudioJS for the HTML5 audio player but I don't think this is the one to blame here...)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

When you have a click event the $scope is updated, without the event you'll need to use $apply

$scope.$apply(function () {
    $scope.current = track;
});
share|improve this answer
3  
You sir made my day. However I found that doing it so works always: $scope.current = track; $scope.$apply(); –  Pierlo Upitup Oct 17 '12 at 14:41
1  
Hadn't thought of doing that - good to know, cheers. –  Fuzzpedal Oct 17 '12 at 14:53
    
Actually, that gives a Error: $digest already in progress in the console... mh? –  Pierlo Upitup Oct 17 '12 at 15:13
1  
you can check $scope.$$phase to see if the scope is being updated, if so you don't need $apply –  Gal Ben-Haim Jan 17 '13 at 22:22
3  
@PierloUpitup It's better practice put it inside the $apply function as it runs the code inside a try/catch/finally: the try/catch handles the error and the finally uses $digest to run your code regardless of the error. –  GFoley83 May 16 '13 at 4:35

As it's not safe to peek into the the digest internals, the easiest way is to use $timeout:

$timeout(function () {
    $scope.current = track;
}, 0);

The callback is executed always in the good environment.

EDIT: In fact, the function that should be wrapped in the apply phase is

 this.loadTrack = function(track) {
     // ... loads the track and plays it
     // broadcast 'trackLoaded' event when done
     $timeout(function() { $rootScope.$broadcast('trackLoaded', track); });
 };

Otherwise the broadcast will get missed.

share|improve this answer
1  
$timeout executes the function in the $apply block. From angular docs: Usage $timeout(fn[, delay][, invokeApply]); Parameters fn – {function()} – A function, whose execution should be delayed. delay(optional=0) – {number=} – Delay in milliseconds. invokeApply(optional=true) – {boolean=} – If set to false skips model dirty checking, otherwise will invoke fn within the $apply block. –  TestersGonnaTest Jun 5 '13 at 11:13
// apply changes
$scope.current = track;
try {
 if (!$scope.$$phase) {
  $scope.$apply($scope.current);
 }
} catch (err) {
 console.log(err);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.