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I want to implement perfomance-sensitive integral calculations in C#. I was told that function int Sin(int angle) that returns a value between -256 and 255 is useful in this situation, since I don't need it to be exact. Is there a good implementation of such a function that I can use, or some algorithm that I can implement?

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closed as off topic by L.B, Raphaël Althaus, Peter O., Jehof, Aleks G Oct 18 '12 at 8:42

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It's just a lookup table. Just create the table using the built-in sin function at startup, and write your function to lookup into that table. Here is a question which is basically the same, your function would just take an int rather than a double: stackoverflow.com/questions/2088194/… - this answer also uses unsafe code to get a bit of extra speed, but you can just use a normal array if you don't want unsafe code. –  James Gaunt Oct 17 '12 at 7:28
    
I think that this comment is actually a perfect answer to my question. Thanks! –  Max Yankov Oct 17 '12 at 7:37
    
@JamesGaunt post this as an answer... –  tomfanning Oct 17 '12 at 7:37
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Ok - posted as an answer. –  James Gaunt Oct 17 '12 at 7:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's just a lookup table. Just create the table using the built-in sin function at startup, and write your function to lookup into that table. Here is a question which is basically the same, your function would just take an int rather than a double:

Fast Sin/Cos using a pre computed translation array

This answer also uses unsafe code to get a bit of extra speed, but you can just use a normal array if you don't want unsafe code

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