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<script type="text/javascript">
window.onload = init;

function init() { //wait for load and watch for click
    var button = document.getElementById("searchbutton");
    button.onclick = handleButtonClick;
}

function handleButtonClick(e) { //get user input and go to a new url
    var textinput = document.getElementById("searchinput");
    var searchterm = textinput.value;
    window.location.assign("http://google.com/example/" + searchterm)
}
</script>

<form>
    <input type="text" name="search" id="searchinput">  
</form>
<input type="submit" value="Ara" id="searchbutton">

In this code block, it gets user input and go to a new url with user input.

if I move last line into form element it doesn't working. But I'm using id to find elements.

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if submit button is part of form, it helps form in submission and page will be refreshed. –  Dev Oct 17 '12 at 8:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of

<input type="submit" value="Ara" id="searchbutton">

use this (MDN docu)

<button type="button" id="searchbutton">Ara</button>

Your button works as a form submit button, so instead of just executing your JavaScript, it also tries to submit the form, which points back to the script itself. By using <button type="button"> you define a mere button without any submitting functionality.

Besides: If you don't need the surrounding <form> element, why not drop it out of the code?

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Thanks for answer and suggestions. I'm new at coding. –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 8:40

you can specify the OnSubmit as explained in the below code fragment, and it will work.

<form method="GET" onsubmit="handleButtonClick(event)"> 
    <input type="text" name="search" id="searchinput">  
</form>

function handleButtonClick(e) { 

    var textinput = document.getElementById("searchinput");
    var searchterm = textinput.value;
    window.location.assign("http://google.com/example/" + searchterm)
    return false;
}
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Why return false is there? (I'm new at coding.) –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 9:05

I suspect that it is because your submit button is submitting the form.

Add e.preventDefault(); and return false; to your code.

function handleButtonClick(e) { //get user input and go to a new url
    e.preventDefault();
    var textinput = document.getElementById("searchinput");
    var searchterm = textinput.value;
    window.location.assign("http://google.com/example/" + searchterm)
    return false;
}

This should stop the form from submitting cross browser.

share|improve this answer
    
e.preventDefault() and return false basically does the same thing... –  Alex Oct 17 '12 at 8:20
1  
@Alex yeah but I believe ( at the back of my mind somewhere ) that old old old browsers (if you care about them) do not have a preventDefault() method, so this is a "Catch All" bit of code. –  Tim B James Oct 17 '12 at 8:30
    
Thanks. I'll use it an Opera extension. This is a bit hard way. I'll prefer @Sirko's answer. –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 8:42
    
@Imrahil Sirko's answer maybe be easier for you to implement, however what happens when a user has javascript turned off? I know this is going to be a very small percentage, but your button is then not going to do anything. If you implement my code, then your form will still submit and you can handle this. –  Tim B James Oct 17 '12 at 10:43
    
I appreciate for explanation. I'm coding an Opera extension so user will have to open javascript. Also why did you put return false? What's it's purpose? –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 10:57

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