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I have a login view with a login viewmodel and encountered a problem that is driving me nuts. Note that I'm using MVVM Light.

In the viewmodel I have three visibility properties that should hide elements in the view depending on the state of the viewmodel.

My properties look like this, all triggering PropertyChangedEvent:

public Visibility ErrorPanelVisibility
public Visibility LoginPanelVisibility
public Visibility LoadingPanelVisibility

And the bindings look like this (omitting margins ect.):

<Border Visibility="{Binding ErrorPanelVisibility}">
<StackPanel Visibility="{Binding LoginPanelVisibility}">
<StackPanel Visibility="{Binding LoadingPanelVisibility}">

When the user press the login button the visibility is changed by a command executing this method in the viewmodel:

private void ExecuteLogin()
{
    ErrorPanelVisibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
    LoginPanelVisibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
    LoadingPanelVisibility = Visibility.Visible;

    // This method takes a few seconds to complete.
    Login(errorMessage =>
            {
                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(errorMessage))
                {
                    ErrorMessage = errorMessage;

                    ErrorPanelVisibility = Visibility.Visible;
                    LoginPanelVisibility = Visibility.Visible;
                    LoadingPanelVisibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
                }
                else
                {
                    DialogResult = true;
                }
            });
}

The problem is that the panels are not being collapsed or changed to visible in the view, the changes are not reflected in the view. The PropertyChangedEvent is fired and the ErrorPanel is working when I set the visibility to Visible, but not Collapsed.

Edit: The login method:

private void Login(Action<string> callback)
{           
    string errorMessage = string.Empty;

    if (SelectedServer == null)
    {
        errorMessage = "Select server."; //TODO: Translate
    }
    else if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(Username) || String.IsNullOrEmpty(Password))
    {
        errorMessage = Resources.WrongUsernameOrPassword;
    }
    else
    {
        try
        {
            // Changed name due to customer information
            IWCFClient wcfClient = WCFClient.GetInstance(); 

            LoginObj loginObj = wcfClient.Login(Username, Password);

            // Removed some cases to simplify, they all set the errorMessage.
            switch (loginObj.LoginStatus)
            {
                case LoginObj.LoginState.AlreadyLogedin:
                    errorMessage = Resources.UserAlreadyLoggedOn;
                    break;
                default:
                    errorMessage = Resources.ErrorOccurred;
                    break;    
            }                
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            errorMessage = e.Message;
        }
    }
    callback(errorMessage);
}

But, the panels do work if I change my code to this:

bool login = false;
private void ExecuteLogin()
{
    if (login)
    {
        ErrorPanelVisibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
        LoginPanelVisibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
        LoadingPanelVisibility = Visibility.Visible;
    }
    else
    {
        ErrorPanelVisibility = Visibility.Visible;
        LoginPanelVisibility = Visibility.Visible;
        LoadingPanelVisibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
    }

    login = !login;
}

Is there any obvious mistake being done here, or can anyone find out what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
is the function passed to Login being called? –  Peter Porfy Oct 17 '12 at 8:25
    
If so then please post the code of the Login method. if not, then post it too :) –  Peter Porfy Oct 17 '12 at 8:26
    
Yes, the function to login is called. I can post the login method but I have to omit some parts of it. –  Fredrik Lindfors Oct 17 '12 at 8:33
    
if you are executing the delegate method (which passed as parameter to login method) in background worker or in a thread.. their is a fair chance to ignore your UI changes... like Peter porfy i suggest you to post the login method .. –  bathineni Oct 17 '12 at 8:33
    
I think you have an issue with your login method too. On a side note, be carefull when using lambda expression : in your case you are referencing Properties of the class, which means that your instance will be strongely hold by the lambda, and that can cause memory leaks. It's almost never a good thing to reference outer variables/properties in a lambda expression. –  Sisyphe Oct 17 '12 at 8:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are doing all your work on the UI thread and the panels never get a chance to update. Use a BackgroundWorker to keep your UI responsive:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc221403(v=vs.95).aspx

It should be more like:

1) Change some properties that affect UI bindings

2) Start a worker thread

3) Give back control of the UI thread to allow for updates

4) Respond to the worker thread being finished by changing some properties that affect UI bindings

share|improve this answer
    
I will try this out and return to you with an answer! –  Fredrik Lindfors Oct 17 '12 at 9:52
    
It worked, you saved my day! Thanks a lot! –  Fredrik Lindfors Oct 17 '12 at 10:09
    
I'm glad it helped –  MrDosu Oct 17 '12 at 10:45

Also. I suggest you to avoid UI types in ViewModels. Try to use bool value and use BoolToVisibilityConverter.

P.S. Ensure you setup DataContext for your control.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 to avoid UI types in VM, that violates MVVM –  Peter Porfy Oct 17 '12 at 8:21
1  
Sure, I can change that. But that isn't really the problem right now. –  Fredrik Lindfors Oct 17 '12 at 8:31

1) You missed Binding.Mode. So, you have to add Mode to the xaml binding, for example, <Border Visibility="{Binding ErrorPanelVisibility, Mode=OneWay}">.

2) The ViewModel must implement INotifyPropertyChange to raise changed from itself to the View.

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

// Create the OnPropertyChanged method to raise the event 
protected void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
{
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
    }
}

public Visibility ErrorPanelVisibility 
{
    get { return this._errorPanelVisibility; }
    set
    {
        if (this._errorPanelVisibility == value)
        {
            return;
        }

        this._errorPanelVisibility = value;
        OnPropertyChanged("ErrorPanelVisibility");
    }
}

I also agree with Dima Martovoi, you should not mix View with the ViewModel. There are at least 2 ways of doing this, the first one is move code that related to view to click event or you can use Messenger to send a message from the ViewModel to the View.

share|improve this answer
    
But how come it works when I omit the method? I have changed my code to work with bool instead of visibility as suggested by Dima Martovoi. But as I said before, that really isns't the problem. –  Fredrik Lindfors Oct 17 '12 at 9:32
    
There are two problems on the code, 1. you don't set Binding.Mode on xaml. The default behavior is binding only one time. 2. The properties on ViewModel don't raise the property change. –  Ekk Oct 17 '12 at 9:36
    
I appreciates your answer and effort, but I don't think this is the problem. As I stated in the original post, all properties are triggering PropertyChangedEvent. Regarding the Binding.Mode, the default value depends on what property I databind to, read more about it here if you like msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms752347.aspx –  Fredrik Lindfors Oct 17 '12 at 9:51

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