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When using the TypeScript plugin for vs.net, how do I make one TypeScript file import modules declared in other TypeScript files?

file 1:

module moo
{
    export class foo .....
}

file 2:

//what goes here?

class bar extends moo.foo
{
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 51 down vote accepted

You need to reference the file on the top of the current file.

You can do this like this:

/// <reference path="../typings/jquery.d.ts"/>
/// <reference path="components/someclass.ts"/>

class Foo { }

etc.

These paths are relative to the current file.

Your example:

/// <reference path="moo.ts"/>

class bar extends moo.foo
{
}
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1  
This works fine, however, when I compile the code to js. there are no "require" or any kind of link to the external files... from what I can see on other examples, I should do a "import moo = module("moo"); however, it does complain that there is no moo in the current scope –  Roger Alsing Oct 17 '12 at 8:58
    
Yes, reference doesn't generates any js code which loads that js after compile. It's just for the compiler. I don't have experience with TypeScript and AMD because I simply bundle the generated js files so everything I need is there. But I see what you need and you can read more about that here: typescriptlang.org/Content/… at page 75 (chapter 9). Btw it worth reading the whole specification, it's relatively short compared to other languages. –  Peter Porfy Oct 17 '12 at 9:10
1  
You can use the --all flag with tsc on your main .ts file. The compiler figures out all the dependencies based on your reference tags and generates a single output .js file for the entire application: tsc --out app.js main.ts –  null Apr 13 '14 at 9:57

Typescript distinguishes two different kinds of modules: Internal modules are used to structure your code internally. At compile-time, you have to bring internal modules into scope using reference paths:

/// <reference path='moo.ts'/>

class bar extends moo.foo {
}

On the other hand, external modules are used to refernence external source files that are to be loaded at runtime using CommonJS or AMD. In your case, to use external module loading you have to do the following:

moo.ts

export class foo {
    test: number;
} 

app.ts

import moo = module('moo');
class bar extends moo.foo {
  test2: number;
}

Note the different way of brining the code into scope. With external modules, you have to use module with the name of the source file that contains the module definition. If you want to use AMD modules, you have to call the compiler as follows:

tsc --module amd app.ts

This then gets compiled to

var __extends = this.__extends || function (d, b) {
    function __() { this.constructor = d; }
    __.prototype = b.prototype;
    d.prototype = new __();
}
define(["require", "exports", 'moo'], function(require, exports, __moo__) {
    var moo = __moo__;

    var bar = (function (_super) {
        __extends(bar, _super);
        function bar() {
            _super.apply(this, arguments);

        }
        return bar;
    })(moo.foo);
})    
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I feel completely lost right now, no matter what I do, the compiler generates a separate .js for each .ts file and there are no "require" code in either of them... also " import moo=module("moo"); " gives an error that the name moo does not exist in the current scope , highlighting the module("moo") part –  Roger Alsing Oct 17 '12 at 9:27
    
A few points to clarify here: Are you working in Visual Studio? Did you try to compile the code I gave in the answer using tsc directly? Did you place both files in the same directory? –  Valentin Oct 17 '12 at 9:34
    
yes, compiling from commandline , both files in the same directory. –  Roger Alsing Oct 17 '12 at 9:54
1  
I have forked and sent you a pull request. Please let me know if that worked. –  Valentin Oct 17 '12 at 11:58
7  
perfect :) for others reading this: modules needs to be exported too, "export module xxx" –  Roger Alsing Oct 17 '12 at 12:14

If you're using AMD modules, the other answers won't work in TypeScript 1.0 (the newest at the time of writing.)

You have different approaches available to you, depending upon how many things you wish to export from each .ts file.

Multiple exports

Foo.ts

export class Foo {}
export interface IFoo {}

Bar.ts

import fooModule = require("Foo");

var foo1 = new fooModule.Foo();
var foo2: fooModule.IFoo = {};

Single export

Foo.ts

class Foo
{}

export = Foo;

Bar.ts

import Foo = require("Foo");

var foo = new Foo();
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I like the above approach, and find that tsc.exe is generating correct dependencies in that initial call to define(), which is GREAT! The problem for me is 2 separate classes, each in their own file, each wrapped in an export module - I can do the "import", and one could use the other, but can class A inherit from B, still using the TypeScript extends somehow? –  Samuel Meacham Feb 13 '14 at 20:02
    
@SamuelMeacham, sure, I don't see why not. If you're still having trouble, ask a new question and link to it here. I'll take a look. –  Drew Noakes Feb 13 '14 at 21:47
1  
This got me sorted out, everything is super smooth now. Dependencies, inheritance, all of it: stackoverflow.com/questions/21179144/… –  Samuel Meacham Feb 26 '14 at 19:25
    
@SamuelMeacham are you referring to this page or the link you provided, because this answer from Drew seems spot on... –  Alex Mills Dec 3 '14 at 1:42

If you are looking to use modules and want it to compile to a single JavaScript file you can do the following:

tsc -out _compiled/main.js Main.ts

Main.ts

///<reference path='AnotherNamespace/ClassOne.ts'/>
///<reference path='AnotherNamespace/ClassTwo.ts'/>

module MyNamespace
{
    import ClassOne = AnotherNamespace.ClassOne;
    import ClassTwo = AnotherNamespace.ClassTwo;

    export class Main
    {
        private _classOne:ClassOne;
        private _classTwo:ClassTwo;

        constructor()
        {
            this._classOne = new ClassOne();
            this._classTwo = new ClassTwo();
        }
    }
}

ClassOne.ts

///<reference path='CommonComponent.ts'/>

module AnotherNamespace
{
    export class ClassOne
    {
        private _component:CommonComponent;

        constructor()
        {
            this._component = new CommonComponent();
        }
    }
}

CommonComponent.ts

module AnotherNamespace
{
    export class CommonComponent
    {
        constructor()
        {
        }
    }
}

You can read more here: http://www.codebelt.com/typescript/javascript-namespacing-with-typescript-internal-modules/

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thank you, needed exactly this –  Flion Jan 3 '14 at 14:28

used a reference like "///<reference path="web.ts" /> and then in the VS2013 project properties for building "app.ts","Typescript Build"->"Combine javascript output into file:"(checked)->"app.js"

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