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I am learning about the builder pattern, and so far I understood that, it is a great alternative to the commonly patterns used for initialization:

  • Telescoping Constructor Pattern

  • JavaBean Pattern

The thing is, I don't really like to remove the getters and setters from the objects in my domain model. I always like to keep them as POJOs. One of the reasons I don't like it is: If i don't use POJOs, then it is not easy to annotate the variables when using ORM frameworks...

So here are my doubts: -Is it possible to implement the builder pattern without using static inner classes? -If I have to use the builder pattern by using the inner class, do you think it is correct to keep the getters and the setters? -I did a little example for practice where I tried to avoid the inner class. Could you let me what do you think about it?

Product

    public class Product
{
    private String color;
    private int price;

    public Product() {
    }

    public String getColor() {
        return color;
    }

    public void setColor(String color) {
        this.color = color;
    }

    public int getPrice() {
        return price;
    }

    public void setPrice(int price) {
        this.price = price;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return getColor() + "\n" + getPrice();
    }    
}

Builder

public class Builder
{
    private Product product;

    public Builder() {
        product = new Product();
    }
    public Builder withColor(String color) {        
        product.setColor(color);
        return this;
    }

     public Builder withPrice(int price) {        
        product.setPrice(price);
        return this;
    }
    public Product build() {
        return product;
    }
}**

Client

public class Client
{

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(new Builder().withColor("Black").withPrice(11).build());
        System.out.println("-----------------------------------------------------");
        System.out.println(new Builder().withColor("Blue").withPrice(12).build());
    }
}

enter image description here

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The Builder pattern is useful to create immutable objects and avoid several constructors with optional parameters.

IMO using Builder pattern to build a POJO which can be updated using setters is useless. You only create an additional class.

Depending on the ORM framework used, it might not need the presence of setter method. But only assigning members values through reflection.

Product class:

public final class Product {
    private final String color;
    private final int price;

    public Product(Builder builder) {
        this.color = builder.getColor();
        this.price = builder.getPrice();
    }

    public String getColor() {
        return color;
    }

    public int getPrice() {
        return price;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return getColor() + "\n" + getPrice();
    }    
}

Builder class:

public final class Builder {

    private String color;
    private int price;

    public Builder() {
        // Assign any default values
    }

    public Builder color(String color) {        
        this.color = color;
        return this;
    }

    public Builder price(int price) {        
        this.price = price;
        return this;
    }

    protected String getColor() {
        return color;
    }

    protected int getPrice() {
        return price;
    }

    public Product build() {
        return new Product(this);
    }
}
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What does using a builder here actually gain you?

Nothing as far as I can see: you could just create a new Product and use the getters and setters on it directly. If you have a simple POJO then there is absolutely nothing wrong with:

Product p=new Product();
p.setColour("Black");
p.setPrice(11);
doSomethingWith(p);

Saving a few characters of typing is IMHO not worth introducing a new class / builder abstraction.

Builders are more useful in situations like the following:

  • You want to create an immutable object (and hence can't use setters)
  • If you have complicated factory logic that cannot easily be expressed with simple getters and setters or that you want to re-use in different ways
  • (Occasionally) when you want to have different parts of the code base configure different aspects of the builder for some reason.
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I was assuming the example given was a gross simplification to allow experimentation with the concept. –  Duncan Oct 17 '12 at 9:23
    
Sure, but the principle still applies no matter how simple/complex the case: you should have a reason why you want or need to use a builder before choosing this pattern. –  mikera Oct 17 '12 at 9:26

Is it possible to implement the builder pattern without using static inner classes?

Absolutely, yes. As far as the Builder design pattern is concerned, it does not make any difference if the Builder is an inner class or not.

-If I have to use the builder pattern by using the inner class, do you think it is correct to keep the getters and the setters?

Yes, it is ok. it is kind of like, build the object using a certain template and then customize it, if needed.

-I did a little example for practice where I tried to avoid the inner class. Could you let me what do you think about it?

Two problems -

  1. the example does not justify the usage of Builder pattern. Builder pattern is used to build a complex object. So if you can simply build product as : Product p = new Product(); p.setColor(c); p.setPrice(prc); Then there is hardly any benefit in the way you have shown.
  2. Product should not have a dependency on Builder.
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The builder pattern lends itself well to producing immutable classes, but it can still be a good option for mutable classes too.

A builder is a reasonable design choice in any situation where an object contains many fields that need to be set during construction; particularly if sensible defaults can be chosen for several of the values.

Whether you use an inner class depends upon your goals. If you wish to force construction through the builder, you can define the builder as an inner class and ensure the outer class only has a private constructor.

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Builder is about several things and you may want to utilize only one aspect: fluent API. You may attain the best fit for your needs by just changing your setters to return this instead of void. Then you can use the chained-setter idiom: return new MyBean().setCheese(cheese).setBacon(bacon);

On a side note, the term "POJO" does not mean the same as "JavaBean". In fact, sometimes these two terms are used as opposites. The point of a POJO is that it doesn't conform to anything else than being a Java object. It may use public variables, for example.

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The builder pattern is most useful in the context of immutable objects. Immutable objects don't have setters by definition. So all of their properties have to be squeezed into the constructor. This is where the builder pattern comes in handy. It allows you to split the initialization of a complex immutable object into multiple, self-explaining instructions so you don't need to have constructor calls like this fictional example all over you code where you can't tell which argument does what:

Thing foo = new Thing(1, 125, Thing.SOMETHING, new Whatchamacallit(17, 676), getStuffManager(StuffManager.ZOMG), true, false, false, maybe);

I don't find that the Builder pattern creates any signficant value when the created object is mutable. Everything you do through the builder can also be done with the created object directly.

Also, I think that your program above is not a textbook example of the builder pattern. You usually don't create an object by passing the builder to the constructor. You create an object by calling a create method on the builder which then passes all its properties to the constructor of the object. This pattern has the advantage that it gives the builder the opportunity to check its internal state for consistency and maybe throw an exception before starting to build the object.

The java StringBuilder class is a good example (the create method being tostring in this case).

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I understand, I mentioned this in the question. That thing that code wrote there is an example of the telescopic constructor pattern Could you then provide an example where the builder can be extended in 2 different concrete builders? I am not sure how to do this if i am using an inner class. –  sfrj Oct 17 '12 at 9:39
    
It's not really a telescopic constructor when you only have a single one. A telescopic constructor is when you have a class with a lot of optional properties, so you haven't got just one but a lot of different constructors for this class, each with different combinations of the optional properties. In a Builder pattern you would still have the monster-constructor above, but you would only call it from a single place: from the create method of the Builder. –  Philipp Oct 17 '12 at 9:55

Here are Builder collaborations from GoF book: Collaborations 1. The client creates the Director object and configures it with the desired Builder object. 2. Director notifies the builder whenever a part of the product should be built. 3. Builder handles requests from the director and adds parts to the product. 3. The client retrieves the product from the builder.

The Builder pattern focuses on constructing a complex object step by step. Builder returns the product as a final step. The returned class in absence of the setters may be as good as immutable. With setters, it can be modified. And inner classes help mask the details.

Another point worth noting is that a major motivation behind creational design patterns is that the client doesn't worry about creating the product. The object creation process is delegated to factory, builder, etc. The client doesn't have to worry about object creation. It will specify what it wants and will get it as a result of delegated creation process.

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