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In my application I have 4 threads adding elements to a PriorityBlockingQueue and one thread polling elements out of it. For the polling thread the queue seems to be not accessible. I assume I have to take measures to make it thread safe.

After I take the first element I clear the queue, it should be filled up again by the other 4 filling threads.

The polling and filling threads are inside the same class which holds the PriorityBlockingQueue.

That's the code for the polling one:

private class UPPainter implements Runnable {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        while(queue.size() > 0) {
            ReceivedMsg msg = queue.poll();
            queue.clear();
            for(final IPacketListener c : listeners) {
                new Thread(new ListenerUp(c, msg)).start();
            }
        }
    }
}
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Err.. why are you polling a PriorityBlockingQueue with no actual blocking? Why are you clearing it after receiving one element? This code is a bit...strange. –  Martin James Oct 17 '12 at 9:59
    
I get packets with 10Hz frequency but can't process them at these frequency, so I store them in the queue to get them compared and just poll the important one. After getting one it will be processed (takes 2 seconds) and I clear the queue (will be filled up by the other threads again) ... how blocking should be done, that's the question? –  nyyrikki Oct 17 '12 at 10:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When your consumer threads start, the queue is possibly empty, so size = 0 and run() will exit. You have to actually wait for a msg to be entered. Also clearing the queue doesn't seem to make sense to me? If you want to "close" the consumer threads, send a special end-of-queue message. Use queue.take() to actually block until an element is inserted:

private class UPPainter implements Runnable {  
    @Override  
    public void run() {  
        while(true) {  
            ReceivedMsg msg = queue.take();  
            for(final IPacketListener c : listeners) {  
                new Thread(new ListenerUp(c, msg)).start();  
            }  
        }  
    }  
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh no, it seems the you are right and the if-clause made the difference. I clear the queue because it is filled up much faster than it is taken from it (and during the processing of the messages which is done via new Thread(new ListenerUp(c, msg)).start() I do not need to store the "old" messages in the queue. –  nyyrikki Oct 17 '12 at 10:15
    
hmm, then you won't need the loop at all. Simple queue.take();queue.clear(); –  Udo Klimaschewski Oct 17 '12 at 10:17

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