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Does someone have an idea on where I could find some javascript code to parse CSV data ?

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2  
Take a look at this answer here, it has good answers: stackoverflow.com/questions/8493195/… –  Dobes Vandermeer Feb 8 '12 at 8:17
9  
Most of the answers below are just wrong, aside from the one by Andy. Any answer that uses pattern matching or splits is doomed to fail --they will not support escape sequences. For that, you need a finite state machine. –  greg.kindel Jan 17 '13 at 22:33
    
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closed as off topic by Andrew Barber Apr 18 '13 at 1:08

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8 Answers

up vote 126 down vote accepted

You can use the CSVToArray() function mentioned in this blog entry.

<script type="text/javascript">

    // This will parse a delimited string into an array of
    // arrays. The default delimiter is the comma, but this
    // can be overriden in the second argument.
    function CSVToArray( strData, strDelimiter ){
    	// Check to see if the delimiter is defined. If not,
    	// then default to comma.
    	strDelimiter = (strDelimiter || ",");

    	// Create a regular expression to parse the CSV values.
    	var objPattern = new RegExp(
    		(
    			// Delimiters.
    			"(\\" + strDelimiter + "|\\r?\\n|\\r|^)" +

    			// Quoted fields.
    			"(?:\"([^\"]*(?:\"\"[^\"]*)*)\"|" +

    			// Standard fields.
    			"([^\"\\" + strDelimiter + "\\r\\n]*))"
    		),
    		"gi"
    		);


    	// Create an array to hold our data. Give the array
    	// a default empty first row.
    	var arrData = [[]];

    	// Create an array to hold our individual pattern
    	// matching groups.
    	var arrMatches = null;


    	// Keep looping over the regular expression matches
    	// until we can no longer find a match.
    	while (arrMatches = objPattern.exec( strData )){

    		// Get the delimiter that was found.
    		var strMatchedDelimiter = arrMatches[ 1 ];

    		// Check to see if the given delimiter has a length
    		// (is not the start of string) and if it matches
    		// field delimiter. If id does not, then we know
    		// that this delimiter is a row delimiter.
    		if (
    			strMatchedDelimiter.length &&
    			(strMatchedDelimiter != strDelimiter)
    			){

    			// Since we have reached a new row of data,
    			// add an empty row to our data array.
    			arrData.push( [] );

    		}


    		// Now that we have our delimiter out of the way,
    		// let's check to see which kind of value we
    		// captured (quoted or unquoted).
    		if (arrMatches[ 2 ]){

    			// We found a quoted value. When we capture
    			// this value, unescape any double quotes.
    			var strMatchedValue = arrMatches[ 2 ].replace(
    				new RegExp( "\"\"", "g" ),
    				"\""
    				);

    		} else {

    			// We found a non-quoted value.
    			var strMatchedValue = arrMatches[ 3 ];

    		}


    		// Now that we have our value string, let's add
    		// it to the data array.
    		arrData[ arrData.length - 1 ].push( strMatchedValue );
    	}

    	// Return the parsed data.
    	return( arrData );
    }

</script>
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This can handle embedded commas, quotes and line breaks, eg.: var csv = 'id, value\n1, James\n02,"Jimmy Smith, Esq."\n003,"James ""Jimmy"" Smith, III"\n0004,"James\nSmith\nWuz Here"' var array = CSVToArray(csv, ","); –  user645715 Jun 6 '12 at 20:27
    
This has worked for a wide variety of files. I find that it appends an extra blank row at the end. Not sure if this is the best way to but suggest adding a check that the new line has at least one value, even if explicitly blank "" ` if (arrMatches[2] || arrMatches[3]) { arrData.push([]); rowCount++; } else { break; } }` –  user645715 Oct 30 '12 at 3:00
3  
It gives undefined for empty fields that is quoted. Example: CSVToArray("4,,6") gives me [["4","","6"]], but CSVToArray("4,\"\",6") gives me [["4",undefined,"6"]]. –  Pang Nov 14 '12 at 4:36
    
arrMatches[ 2 ] != undefined –  Pepijn Jan 23 '13 at 11:25
1  
I've had issues with this in firefox, and the script has become unresponsive. It seemed to only affect a few users though, so couldn't find the cause –  JDandChips Mar 18 '13 at 11:51
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I think I can sufficiently beat Kirtan's answer

Enter jQuery-CSV

It's a jquery plugin designed to work as an end-to-end solution for parsing CSV into Javascript data. It handles every single edge case presented in RFC 4180, as well as some that pop up for Excel/Google Spreadsheed exports (ie mostly involving null values) that the spec is missing.

Example:

track,artist,album,year

Dangerous,'Busta Rhymes','When Disaster Strikes',1997

// calling this
music = $.csv.toArrays(csv)

// outputs...
[
  ["track","artist","album","year"],
  ["Dangerous","Busta Rhymes","When Disaster Strikes","1997"]
]

console.log(music[1][2]) // outputs: 'When Disaster Strikes'

Update:

Oh yeah, I should also probably mention that it's completely configurable.

music = $.csv.toArrays(csv, {
  delimiter:"'", // sets a custom value delimiter character
  separator:';', // sets a custom field separator character
});

Update 2:

It now works with jQuery on Node.js too. So you have the option of doing either client-side or server-side parsing with the same lib.

Disclaimer: I am also the author of jQuery-CSV.

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9  
Why is it jQuery csv? Why does it depend on jQuery? I've had a quick scan through the source... it doesn't look like you're using jQuery –  paulslater19 May 10 '12 at 8:20
    
This is great. Would be useful to extend this to handle embedded line breaks or escaped double quotes, e.g. "James ""Jimmy"" Smith" or "Embedded\nLine\nBreaks" –  user645715 Jun 6 '12 at 20:18
9  
@paulslater19 The plugin doesn't depend on jquery. Rather, it follows the common jQuery development guidelines. All of the methods included are static and reside under their own namespace (ie $.csv). To use them without jQuery simply create a global $ object that the plugin will bind to during initialization. –  Evan Plaice Nov 19 '12 at 20:48
1  
@bouncingHippo In the example it's just referring to a string of csv data but the lib can be used to open csv files locally in the browser using the HTML5 File API. Here's an example of it in action jquery-csv.googlecode.com/git/examples/file-handling.html. –  Evan Plaice Nov 23 '12 at 22:09
1  
@EvanPlaice you are the MASTER!!! +99 if i can :) –  bouncingHippo Jan 30 '13 at 19:21
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I have an implementation as part of a spreadsheet project.

This code is not yet tested thoroughly, but anyone is welcome to use it.

As some of the answers noted though, your implementation can be much simpler if you actually have DSV or TSV file, as they disallow the use of the record and field separators in the values. CSV, on the other hand can actually have commas and newlines inside a field, which breaks most regex and split-based approaches.

var CSV = {
parse: function(csv, reviver) {
    reviver = reviver || function(r, c, v) { return v; };
    var chars = csv.split(''), c = 0, cc = chars.length, start, end, table = [], row;
    while (c < cc) {
        table.push(row = []);
        while (c < cc && '\r' !== chars[c] && '\n' !== chars[c]) {
            start = end = c;
            if ('"' === chars[c]){
                start = end = ++c;
                while (c < cc) {
                    if ('"' === chars[c]) {
                        if ('"' !== chars[c+1]) { break; }
                        else { chars[++c] = ''; } // unescape ""
                    }
                    end = ++c;
                }
                if ('"' === chars[c]) { ++c; }
                while (c < cc && '\r' !== chars[c] && '\n' !== chars[c] && ',' !== chars[c]) { ++c; }
            } else {
                while (c < cc && '\r' !== chars[c] && '\n' !== chars[c] && ',' !== chars[c]) { end = ++c; }
            }
            row.push(reviver(table.length-1, row.length, chars.slice(start, end).join('')));
            if (',' === chars[c]) { ++c; }
        }
        if ('\r' === chars[c]) { ++c; }
        if ('\n' === chars[c]) { ++c; }
    }
    return table;
},

stringify: function(table, replacer) {
    replacer = replacer || function(r, c, v) { return v; };
    var csv = '', c, cc, r, rr = table.length, cell;
    for (r = 0; r < rr; ++r) {
        if (r) { csv += '\r\n'; }
        for (c = 0, cc = table[r].length; c < cc; ++c) {
            if (c) { csv += ','; }
            cell = replacer(r, c, table[r][c]);
            if (/[,\r\n"]/.test(cell)) { cell = '"' + cell.replace(/"/g, '""') + '"'; }
            csv += (cell || 0 === cell) ? cell : '';
        }
    }
    return csv;
}
};
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5  
This is one of my favorite answers. It's a real parser implemented in not a lot of code. –  Trevor Dixon Dec 20 '12 at 7:15
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Here's my PEG(.js) grammar that seems to do ok at RFC 4180 (i.e. it handles the examples at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comma-separated_values):

start
  = [\n\r]* first:line rest:([\n\r]+ data:line { return data; })* [\n\r]* { rest.unshift(first); return rest; }

line
  = first:field rest:("," text:field { return text; })*
    & { return !!first || rest.length; } // ignore blank lines
    { rest.unshift(first); return rest; }

field
  = '"' text:char* '"' { return text.join(''); }
  / text:[^\n\r,]* { return text.join(''); }

char
  = '"' '"' { return '"'; }
  / [^"]

Try it out at http://jsfiddle.net/knvzk/10 or http://pegjs.majda.cz/online. Download the generated parser at https://gist.github.com/3362830.

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1  
PEG? Isn't building an AST a little memory heavy for a Type III grammar. Can it handle fields that contain newline chars because that's the most difficult case to cover in a 'regular grammar' parser. Either way, +1 for a novel approach. –  Evan Plaice Jan 31 '13 at 1:37
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Yes, it handles newline inside a field. –  Trevor Dixon Jan 31 '13 at 3:52
2  
Nice... With that alone, it's better than 95% of all the implementations I have ever seen. If you want to check for full RFC compliance, take a look at the tests here (jquery-csv.googlecode.com/git/test/test.html). –  Evan Plaice Jan 31 '13 at 18:24
4  
Well played. +1 for turning me on to PEG. I do love parser-generators. "Why program by hand in five days what you can spend five years of your life automating?" -- Terence Parr, ANTLR –  Subfuzion Mar 28 '13 at 22:51
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Here's an extremely simple CSV parser that handles quoted fields with commas, new lines, and escaped double quotation marks. There's no splitting or RegEx. It scans the input string 1-2 characters at a time and builds an array.

Test it at http://jsfiddle.net/vHKYH/.

function parseCSV(str) {
    var arr = [];
    var quote = false;  // true means we're inside a quoted field

    // iterate over each character, keep track of current row and column (of the returned array)
    for (var row = col = c = 0; c < str.length; c++) {
        var cc = str[c], nc = str[c+1];        // current character, next character
        arr[row] = arr[row] || [];             // create a new row if necessary
        arr[row][col] = arr[row][col] || '';   // create a new column (start with empty string) if necessary

        // If the current character is a quotation mark, and we're inside a
        // quoted field, and the next character is also a quotation mark,
        // add a quotation mark to the current column and skip the next character
        if (cc == '"' && quote && nc == '"') { arr[row][col] += cc; ++c; continue; }  

        // If it's just one quotation mark, begin/end quoted field
        if (cc == '"') { quote = !quote; continue; }

        // If it's a comma and we're not in a quoted field, move on to the next column
        if (cc == ',' && !quote) { ++col; continue; }

        // If it's a newline and we're not in a quoted field, move on to the next
        // row and move to column 0 of that new row
        if (cc == '\n' && !quote) { ++row; col = 0; continue; }

        // Otherwise, append the current character to the current column
        arr[row][col] += cc;
    }
    return arr;
}
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Its simple and it works for me, the only thing I changed was adding a trim() to the value :) –  JustEngland Jan 21 at 22:01
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csvToArray v1.3

A compact (645 bytes) but compliant function to convert a CSV string into a 2D array, conforming to the RFC4180 standard.

http://code.google.com/p/csv-to-array/

Common Usage: jQuery

 $.ajax({
        url: "test.csv",
        dataType: 'text',
        cache: false
 }).done(function(csvAsString){
        csvAsArray=csvAsString.csvToArray();
 });

Common usage: Javascript

csvAsArray = csvAsString.csvToArray();

Override field separator

csvAsArray = csvAsString.csvToArray("|");

Override record separator

csvAsArray = csvAsString.csvToArray("", "#");

Override Skip Header

csvAsArray = csvAsString.csvToArray("", "", 1);

Override all

csvAsArray = csvAsString.csvToArray("|", "#", 1);
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Im not sure why I couldn't kirtans ex. to work for me. It seemed to be failing on empty fields or maybe fields with trailing commas...

This one seems to handle both.

I did not write the parser code, just a wrapper around the parser function to make this work for a file. see Attribution

    var Strings = {
        /**
         * Wrapped csv line parser
         * @param s string delimited csv string
         * @param sep separator override
         * @attribution : http://www.greywyvern.com/?post=258 (comments closed on blog :( )
         */
        parseCSV : function(s,sep) {
            // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1155678/javascript-string-newline-character
            var universalNewline = /\r\n|\r|\n/g;
            var a = s.split(universalNewline);
            for(var i in a){
                for (var f = a[i].split(sep = sep || ","), x = f.length - 1, tl; x >= 0; x--) {
                    if (f[x].replace(/"\s+$/, '"').charAt(f[x].length - 1) == '"') {
                        if ((tl = f[x].replace(/^\s+"/, '"')).length > 1 && tl.charAt(0) == '"') {
                            f[x] = f[x].replace(/^\s*"|"\s*$/g, '').replace(/""/g, '"');
                          } else if (x) {
                        f.splice(x - 1, 2, [f[x - 1], f[x]].join(sep));
                      } else f = f.shift().split(sep).concat(f);
                    } else f[x].replace(/""/g, '"');
                  } a[i] = f;
        }
        return a;
        }
    }
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Why not just use .split(',') ?

http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_split.asp

var str="How are you doing today?";
var n=str.split(" "); 
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1  
Why is this a bad answer? It is native, places string content into workable array... –  Micah Sep 26 '12 at 15:41
10  
Lots of reasons. First, it doesn't remove the double quotes on delimited values. Doesn't handle line splitting. Doesn't escape double-double quotes used to escape double quotes used in delimited values. Doesn't allow empty values. etc, etc... The flexibility of the CSV format makes it very easy to use but difficult to parse. I won't downvote this but only because I don't downvote competing answers. –  Evan Plaice Oct 6 '12 at 0:51
1  
What about when you encounter a value that contains a newline char? A simple split function will incorrectly interpret it as the end of an entry instead of skipping over it like it should. Parsing CSV is a lot more complicated than just providing 2 split routines (one for newlines, one for delimiters). –  Evan Plaice Oct 16 '12 at 21:40
1  
(cont) Also split on null values (a,null,,value) returns nothing whereas it should return an empty string. Don't get me wrong, split is a good start if you are 100% positive that the incoming data won't break the parser but creating a robust parser that can handle any data that is RFC 4801 compliant is significantly more complicated. –  Evan Plaice Oct 16 '12 at 21:45
3  
Evan, I think your javascript library is awesome. But here's another perspective - I appreciated this answer, as I am simply storing a series of numbers in a very predictable fashion. It is much more important to me to get guaranteed cross-browser Javascript compatibility and maintainability as far into the future as possible, than include a large (albeit well-written and well-tested) library. Different needs require different approaches. If I ever need real CSV power I will DEFINITELY commit to using your library! :-) –  moodboom Feb 20 '13 at 1:01
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