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Consider the following class,

class Foo
{
    public Foo(int count)
    {
        /* .. */
    }

    public Foo(int count)
    {
        /* .. */
    }
}

Above code is invalid and won't compile. Now consider the following code,

class Foo<T>
{
    public Foo(int count)
    {
        /* .. */
    }

    public Foo(T t)
    {
        /* .. */
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Foo<int> foo = new Foo<int>(1);
}

Above code is valid and compiles well. It calls Foo(int count).

My question is, if the first one is invalid, how can the second one be valid? I know class Foo<T> is valid because T and int are different types. But when it is used like Foo<int> foo = new Foo<int>(1), T is getting integer type and both constructor will have same signature right? Why don't compiler show error rather than choosing an overload to execute?

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4 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Your question was hotly debated when C# 2.0 and the generic type system in the CLR were being designed. So hotly, in fact, that the "bound" C# 2.0 specification published by A-W actually has the wrong rule in it! There are four possibilities:

1) Make it illegal to declare a generic class that could POSSIBLY be ambiguous under SOME construction. (This is what the bound spec incorrectly says is the rule.) So your Foo<T> declaration would be illegal.

2) Make it illegal to construct a generic class in a manner which creates an ambiguity. declaring Foo<T> would be legal, constructing Foo<double> would be legal, but constructing Foo<int> would be illegal.

3) Make it all legal and use overload resolution tricks to work out whether the generic or nongeneric version is better. (This is what C# actually does.)

4) Do something else I haven't thought of.

Rule #1 is a bad idea because it makes some very common and harmless scenarios impossible. Consider for example:

class C<T>
{
  public C(T t) { ... } // construct a C that wraps a T
  public C(Stream state) { ... } // construct a C based on some serialized state from disk
}

You want that to be illegal just because C<Stream> is ambiguous? Yuck. Rule #1 is a bad idea, so we scrapped it.

Unfortunately, it is not as simple as that. IIRC the CLI rules say that an implementation is allowed to reject as illegal constructions that actually do cause signature ambiguities. That is, the CLI rules are something like Rule #2, whereas C# actually implements Rule #3. Which means that there could in theory be legal C# programs that translate into illegal code, which is deeply unfortunate.

For some more thoughts on how these sorts of ambiguities make our lives wretched, here are a couple of articles I wrote on the subject:

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2006/04/05/569085.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2006/04/06/odious-ambiguous-overloads-part-two.aspx

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Guess the third Foo<> at 2 has to be int –  Dykam Aug 18 '09 at 16:42
    
Thanks for the answer Eric. –  Appu Aug 19 '09 at 1:51
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There is no ambiguity, because the compiler will choose the most specific overload of Foo(...) that matches. Since a method with a generic type parameter is considered less specific than a corresponding non-generic method, Foo(T) is therefore less specific than Foo(int) when T == int. Accordingly, you are invoking the Foo(int) overload.

Your first case (with two Foo(int) definitions) is an error because the compiler will allow only one definition of a method with precisely the same signature, and you have two.

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I checked the language specification, but it doesn't say generic parameters are less specific than concrete types. Non-generic methods are considered 'better' than generic methods however. –  Thorarin Aug 18 '09 at 11:27
    
You're right, that wasn't phrased very well. I meant to say "a method with a generic type parameter...". –  John Feminella Aug 18 '09 at 11:48
    
BTW, for the curious, I think the section Thorarin is talking about is §14.4.2.2, which defines "better function member". –  John Feminella Aug 18 '09 at 11:49
    
I understand this. But IMO, compiler should warn as this type of behavior makes confusion. –  Appu Aug 18 '09 at 11:52
1  
Not sure how the compiler could do anything useful here by way of a warning - as soon as you defined Foo(T t) - all other single parameter methods with that name would fall foul of the sort of check you suggest. –  Gordon Mackie JoanMiro Aug 18 '09 at 12:01
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Eric Lippert blogged about this recently.

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Thank you, I was looking for that link. –  Brian Rasmussen Aug 18 '09 at 11:14
1  
And, apparently, he's answered the question here as well. –  Mike Two Aug 18 '09 at 20:24
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The fact is that they do not both have the same signature - one is using generics while this other is not.

With those methods in place you could also call it using a non-int object:

Foo<string> foo = new Foo<string>("Hello World");
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