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I did an exercise in hadoop which is used for sorting an object 'IntPair', which is a combination of 2 integers. Here's the input file:

2,9
3,8
2,6
3,2
...

Class 'IntPair' is like this:

static class IntPair implements WritableComparable<IntPair> {
    private int first;
    private int second;   
       ...
   public int compareTo(IntPair o) {
       return (this.first==o.first)?(this.second==o.second?0:(this.second>o.second?1:-1)):(this.first>o.first?1:-1);
    }
   public static int compare(int a, int b) {
   return (a==b)?0:((a>b)?1:-1);
   }
       ...  
}

In the Mapper, I use inputFormat and outputKey/Value, and just create the IntPair instance with 2 integers per line:

protected void map(LongWritable key, Text value, Context context)
        throws IOException, InterruptedException {
            String v[] = value.toString().split(",");
            IntPair k = new IntPair(Integer.parseInt(v[0]), Integer.parseInt(v[1]));
            context.write(k, NullWritable.get());

        }

I partition the mapper result based on the first integer, and also create group comparator based on the first integer. Only the sort comparator is based on both integers.

static class FirstPartitioner extends Partitioner<IntPair, NullWritable> {

    public int getPartition(IntPair key, NullWritable value, int numPartitions) {
            return Math.abs(key.getFirst()*127)%numPartitions;
        }
}
static class BothComparator extends WritableComparator {
    public int compare(WritableComparable w1, WritableComparable w2) {
            IntPair p1 = (IntPair)w1;
            IntPair p2 = (IntPair)w2;
            int cmp = IntPair.compare(p1.getFirst(), p2.getFirst());
            if(cmp != 0) {
                return cmp;
            }
            return -IntPair.compare(p1.getSecond(), p2.getSecond());//reverse sort
    }

}

static class FirstGroupComparator extends WritableComparator {
    public int compare(WritableComparable w1, WritableComparable w2) {
            IntPair p1 = (IntPair)w1;
            IntPair p2 = (IntPair)w2;
            return IntPair.compare(p1.getFirst(), p2.getFirst());
    }
}

And in Reducer, I just output IntPair as key and NullWritable as value:

static class SSReducer extends Reducer<IntPair, NullWritable, IntPair, NullWritable> {
        protected void reduce(IntPair key, Iterable<NullWritable> values,
            Context context)throws IOException, InterruptedException {
            context.write(key, NullWritable.get());
        }
}

After running hadoop, I got the following results:

   2,9
   3,8

Earlier, I had thought that the reducer should group records by key(IntPair). Since each record represents a different key, so each record will call the method 'reduce' once and in that case the results should be:

2,9
2,6
3,8
3,2

So I thought the difference exists because of the group comparator, since it uses only the first integer for comparison. So in the reducer, the records is grouped by the first integer. In this example, it means that each of the 2 records call 'reduce' once, so without looping it produces only the first record per group. Is it right? Also, I did another experiment which changes the reducer as follows:

static class SSReducer extends Reducer<IntPair, NullWritable, IntPair, NullWritable> {
     protected void reduce(IntPair key, Iterable<NullWritable> values,
                Context context)throws IOException, InterruptedException {
                        for(NullWritable n : values) //add looping
                   context.write(key, NullWritable.get());
            }
    }

Then it produces the results in which there are 4 items.

And if I change the groupcomparator to use both integers to compare, it will also produce 4 items. So the reducer actually uses the groupcomparator to group keys, which means each of the records in one group call 'reduce' once even though the keys are different. I wonder if my understanding is right, and appreciate any help.

share|improve this question

Yes, each records in one group call 'reduce' once even though the keys are different. Actually each group calls reduce method once with the first key in the group as 'KEY' and all the values in the group forms the values of the reduce method .

Even though we have only one key(1st key) in the reduce method and all values as iterable you can see that while iterating we will get the corresponding key to the value inside the iterable.

First we go to the groupcomparator with two keys and the reduce method starts and from inside the iterator it again calls the group comperator with another 2 keys.

That means the reducer dont know its iterable value in advance .It is determined while iterating the iterable values.

So if we don iterate the values we will only see the 1st key of the group.If we iterate the values we will get all the keys.

share|improve this answer

Your understanding is correct. The "composite value" of the key makes no difference to the groupings going into the reducer. It's the specific behavior of the comparators and the specific fields they look at that make the deference..

share|improve this answer

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