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In a PostgreSQL 9 database there is a table that contains a serial field X which is a PK (oid enabled), and other fields.

Using postgres's pgadmin with that table - a query takes 30 seconds.

If I add a unique index on the same field X - same query in pgadmin takes 3 seconds.

PKs are implicitly indexes: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/indexes-unique.html

So why does the explicit index make a difference?

Is this a pgadmin issue?

Do I need an explicit index for the PK field or not?

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1  
Shouldn't make any difference PRIMARY KEY is implemented as a unique index plus a not null constraint. Are you sure there is a primary key defined (a serial is not automatically a primary key)? Could you post the DDL statements? –  Eelke Oct 17 '12 at 10:33
2  
Version 9 doesn't exists, there is 9.0, 9.1 and 9.2, very different versions of PostgreSQL. oid's are deprecated as of version 8.1 (released in 2005), why do you need them? –  Frank Heikens Oct 17 '12 at 11:01
    
Post the output of \d my_table in the psql prompt. –  Clodoaldo Neto Oct 17 '12 at 11:17
2  
What makes you think this isn't just a caching issue? If you run the query again after dropping the index does it slow back down or stay fast? Please read stackoverflow.com/tags/postgresql-performance/info for advice on more detail you can supply and ways to improve results. –  Craig Ringer Oct 17 '12 at 12:30
    
thank you all; there is a PK contraint in place; it's postgres 9.0; oid; I will test more, indeed, this might be a caching issue –  tcris Oct 17 '12 at 13:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No difference here (pg 9.1.2), I think it is an artifact (schema, case-insignificance?)

DROP SCHEMA tmp CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA tmp ;
SET search_path=tmp;

CREATE TABLE lutser
        ( id INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
        , val INTEGER NOT NULL
        );
INSERT INTO lutser(id,val)
SELECT g, g %31
FROM generate_series(1,100000) g
        ;

DELETE FROM lutser WHERE random() < .5;

VACUUM ANALYZE lutser;

EXPLAIN ANALYZE
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM lutser
WHERE id >= 1000 AND id < 2000
        ;

CREATE INDEX lutser_id ON lutser(id);

VACUUM ANALYZE lutser;

EXPLAIN ANALYZE
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM lutser
WHERE id >= 1000 AND id < 2000
        ;

Results:

NOTICE:  drop cascades to table tmp.lutser
DROP SCHEMA
CREATE SCHEMA
SET
NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE / PRIMARY KEY will create implicit index "lutser_pkey" for table "lutser"
CREATE TABLE
INSERT 0 100000
DELETE 50051
VACUUM
                                                          QUERY PLAN
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Aggregate  (cost=20.28..20.29 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.294..0.295 rows=1 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using lutser_pkey on lutser  (cost=0.00..19.03 rows=499 width=0) (actual time=0.015..0.216 rows=487 loops=1)
         Index Cond: ((id >= 1000) AND (id < 2000))
 Total runtime: 0.343 ms
(4 rows)

CREATE INDEX
VACUUM
                                                         QUERY PLAN
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Aggregate  (cost=19.03..19.04 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.232..0.232 rows=1 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using lutser_id on lutser  (cost=0.00..17.79 rows=497 width=0) (actual time=0.033..0.185 rows=487 loops=1)
         Index Cond: ((id >= 1000) AND (id < 2000))
 Total runtime: 0.266 ms
(4 rows)
share|improve this answer

Take a look at the query plans (in pgAdmin you can select the EXPLAIN option in the query window, if I remember correctly), to see what's going on in more detail. Are you sure you're not just reading data from the postgresql cache with the second query, or is consistently behaving like that, regardless of the order in which the queries are fired?

Also, run a vacuum after deleting/inserting/manipulating lots of data as that can make a huge difference. I'd be surprised if adding a (superfluous) index is the cause. And as @Eelke points out, are you sure there's an PK already defined on that column?

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thanks, I will run explain analyze and check the execution plan; yes, there is a PK constraint, that's why I was baffled by the huge performance gap –  tcris Oct 17 '12 at 13:09

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