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My question in Perl: Write a Perl Script with a subroutine that accepts a list of values and returns the largest,smallest and average values to the calling program.

#!/usr/bin/perl

sub large_and_small {   
    my (@numbers);
    @numbers = @_;

    my ($small, $large);
    $large = $numbers[0];
    $small = $numbers[0];

    foreach my $i (@numbers) {

        if ($i > $large) {         

            $large = $i;  
        }        
        elsif ($i < $small) {

            $small = $i;  
        }
    }
    return ($small, $large);
}

sub avg {
    my ($avg);
    my ($total);

    foreach (@test_array) {

        $total += $_;
    }
    $avg = $total/scalar @test_array;
    return $avg;
}

my (@test_array, @ret);
@test_array = (15, 5, 7, 3, 9, 1, 20,1 3, 9, 8, 15, 16, 2, 6, 12, 90);
@ret = large_and_small(@test_array);
print "The Largest value is ", $ret[1], "\n";
print "The Smallest value is ", $ret[0], "\n";
print "The Average value is", avg(@test_array), "\n";

The Output I am getting is:

The Largest value is 90
The Smallest value is 1
Illegal division by zero at /tmp/135044395416028.pl line 59.

Where am I going wrong in the script? Please help.Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
2  
Always use use strict; use warnings;!! –  ikegami Oct 17 '12 at 15:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

avg procedure does not see @test_array that you think it should see. Instead, it likely sees empty array.

Rewrite avg as follows and it should work:

sub avg {
    my @test_array = @_;
    my ($avg);
    my ($total);
    # ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Kinda silly to copy @_. Just use for (@_) instead of for (@test_array). –  ikegami Oct 17 '12 at 15:34
    
Well, it is not really that silly. Granted, it is not efficient. But, for humans readability is much more important. And this is exactly why it is there for. –  mvp Oct 18 '12 at 6:20
1  
You're saying @test_array is more meaningful than @_ in a function that averages arbitrary numbers? –  ikegami Oct 18 '12 at 6:22

I advice you use core module: List::Util, it has all functions, that you implemented as min, max, sum.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use List::Util qw(min max sum);

my @test_array = (15, 5, 7, 3, 9, 1, 20, 13, 9, 8, 15, 16, 2, 6, 12, 90);
my $min = min(@test_array);
my $max = max(@test_array);
my $avg = scalar @test_array
        ? (sum(@test_array) / (scalar @test_array))
        : 0;

print "The Largest value is ", $max, "\n";
print "The Smallest value is ", $min, "\n";
print "The Average value is ", $avg, "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much –  user1613245 Oct 17 '12 at 10:45
    
This doesn't answer the question –  Borodin Oct 17 '12 at 14:41
    
I know Sir but I can learn new things. –  user1613245 Oct 17 '12 at 16:59

You are not reading the arguments in avg. Add

my @test_array = @_;

You can also save some variables and do declarations and assignments at the same time:

sub large_and_small {
    my @numbers = @_;
    my ($small, $large) = @numbers[0, 0];

    foreach my $n (@numbers) {
        if ($n > $large) {
            $large = $n;
        }
        elsif ($n < $small) {
            $small = $n;
        }
    }
    return ($small, $large);
}

sub avg {
    my @numbers = @_;
    return unless @numbers;  # Prevent Division by zero
    my $total;
    foreach (@numbers) {
        $total += $_;
    }
    return $total / @numbers;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I got the output. –  user1613245 Oct 17 '12 at 10:37
    
@user1613245 Then you can accept one of the answers by clicking the arrow besides the answers. –  Rohit Jain Oct 17 '12 at 10:38

The test array is declared as lexical in the main, and used directly in the function. Either it has to be passed to the function, or remove the lexical which is not advised.

share|improve this answer

Looks like there's divisionby zero here

$avg = $total/scalar @test_array;

Why are you dividing by scalar?

share|improve this answer
    
scalar @array returns the number of elements of the array. –  choroba Oct 17 '12 at 10:42
2  
The expression is correct. The only problem is that there is no protection against an empty parameter list. –  Borodin Oct 17 '12 at 10:56

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