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Why does STL work with a comparison function that is strict weak ordering? Why can't it be partial ordering?

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Couldn't you clarify of show sample what do you mean? –  Dewfy Aug 18 '09 at 11:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A partial order would not be sufficient to implement some algorithms, such as a sorting algorithm. Since a partially ordered set does not necessarily define a relationship between all elements of the set, how would you sort a list of two items that do not have an order relationship within the partial order?

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Ok, point taken.. :) –  Greg Hewgill Aug 18 '09 at 21:08
    
"partially ordered set does not necessarily define a relationship between all elements of the set" strict weak ordering is no better, it does not always make an element less than or greater than another. –  curiousguy May 22 '13 at 14:50

You cannot perform binary search with partial ordering. You cannot create a binary search tree with partial ordering. What functions/datatypes from algorithm need ordering and can work with partial ordering?

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Simply, a strict weak ordering is defined as an ordering that defines a (computable) equivalence relation. The equivalence classes are ordered by the strict weak ordering: a strict weak ordering is a strict ordering on equivalence classes.

A partial ordering (that is not a strict weak ordering) does not define an equivalence relation, so any specification using the concept of "equivalent elements" is meaningless with a strict weak ordering. All STL associative containers use this concept at some point, so all these specifications are meaningless with a strict weak ordering.

Because a partial ordering (that is not a strict weak ordering) does not defines any strict ordering, you cannot "sort elements" in the common sens according to partial ordering (all you can do is a "topological sort" which has weaker properties).

Given

  • a mathematical set S
  • a partial ordering < over S
  • a value x in S

you can define a partition of S (every element of S is either in L(x), I(x) or G(x)):

L(x) = { y in S | y<x }
I(x) = { y in S | not(y<x) and not(x<y) }
G(x) = { y in S | x<y }

 L(x) : set of elements less than x
 I(x) : set of elements incomparable with x
 G(x) : set of elements greater than x

A sequence is sorted according to < iff for every x in the sequence, elements of L(x) appear first in the sequence, followed by elements of I(x), followed by elements of G(x).

A sequence is topologically sorted iff for every element y that appears after another element x in the sequence, y is not less than x. It is a weaker constraint than being sorted.

It is trivial to prove that every element of L(x) is less than any element of G(x). There is no general relation between elements of L(x) and elements of I(x), or between elements of I(x) and elements of G(x). However, if < is a strict weak relation, than every element of L(x) is less than any element of I(x), and than any element of I(x) is less than any element of G(x).

If < is a strict weak relation, and x<y then any element of L(x) U I(x) is less then any element I(y) U G(y): any element not greater than x is less than any element not less that y. This does not hold for a partial ordering.

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So actually strict weak ordering do define a equivalence relationship implicitly? Say if I(x) < x is false and x < I(x) is false, will this yield a result of x == I(x) ? –  zoujyjs Sep 9 '13 at 12:13
    
@zoujyjs I(x) is a set (a part of S); by I(x) < x do you mean: for each y which is an element of I(x), y < x? If so not(x < E) and not(E < x) (where x is an element of S and E is a part of S) does not imply E = {x}. –  curiousguy Sep 9 '13 at 22:39

You can implement it for example by combining std::multimap/multiset with own predicate, overriding std::less.

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but it is still required to implement strict weak ordering. –  jalf Aug 18 '09 at 11:41
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This answer does not seem to be related with the question... –  gimpf Aug 18 '09 at 11:50

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