Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

"For this program, I want to use program parameter to collect user data. For example, you can compile with program -c 20 which will convert 20 to Celsius, and when compile with program -f 20, the program will convert 20 to fahrenheit. The program can only accept argv[0] as -c or -f, and argv[1] will be converted to floating point. Below is my program, I get some warnings and errors. Can you help me to get it right.

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <string.h>


 int main(int argc, char *argv[])
 {

    const char* c = "-c";
    const char* f = "-f";

    float temp_c;


    if(0==strcmp(argv[1],c))
    { 
      sscanf(s,"%f",&temp_c);
      temp_c =  (argv[2]-32)*5/9;
      printf("%f celsius = %f fahrenheit", &temp_c, argv[2]);


    }else if(f0==strcmp(argv[1],f)){

 sscanf(s,"%f",&temp_c);
 temp_c =  argv[1]*9/5+32;
 printf("%f celsius = %f fahrenheit", &temp_c, argv[2]);

    }else

    {
      printf("please use correct flag");
      exit(0);
    }
 }
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by casperOne Oct 18 '12 at 14:33

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
argv[0] is not what you think it is, for one thing. –  Martin James Oct 17 '12 at 10:40
1  
It's probably a good idea to tell us what the warnings and errors are instead of making us compile it mentally. Just a thought.... –  Russell Troywest Oct 17 '12 at 10:40
1  
Are you sure you mean "compile with" and not "run with"? Also, argv[0] is traditionally the name of your program... so it would never be -f or -c unless you named your program that way... also you can't assign a string literal to a char. –  FatalError Oct 17 '12 at 10:41
1  
..and you cannot compare strings with '==', even if you declare them as the correct type. –  Martin James Oct 17 '12 at 10:42
    
Also, when you have gotten the pointers and arrays sorted out, please check any other of the millions upon millions of questions on the topic "I'm a beginner and my fahrenheit/celsius converter gives me the wrong answer", that you will find all over the net. –  Lundin Oct 17 '12 at 12:42
add comment

4 Answers

This is a mistake (and implementation defined behaviour):

char c = "-c";
char f = "-f"; /* Note I added missing closing "/ */

change to:

const char* c = "-c";
const char* f = "-f";

argv[0] is name of the program. The first argument is stored in argv[1]. You cannot use == to compare the content of strings in C (== compares the base addresses of arrays in which the strings are stored), so this is incorrect:

if(argv[0] == c)

change to:

if (0 == strcmp(argv[1], c))

same for else if condition.

Use scanf(), not sscanf(), to retrieve the user input (s is undefined btw) and check its return value to ensure the variable was assigned a value:

if (1 == scanf("%f", &temp_c))

Final calculation is incorrect:

temp_c =  (argv[1]-32)*5/9

change to:

temp_c =  (temp_c-32)*5/9

same for other calculation.

share|improve this answer
    
#include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> int main(int argc, char argv[]) { const char c = "-c"; const char* f = "-f"; float temp_c; if(0==strcmp(argv[1],c)) { sscanf(s,"%f",&temp_c); temp_c = (argv[2]-32)*5/9; printf("%f celsius = %f fahrenheit", &temp_c, argv[2]); }else if(f0==strcmp(argv[1],f)){ sscanf(s,"%f",&temp_c); temp_c = argv[1]*9/5+32; printf("%f celsius = %f fahrenheit", &temp_c, argv[2]); }else { printf("please use correct flag"); exit(0); } } –  Steven Liu Oct 17 '12 at 10:52
    
I just fixed my program, but still getting errors –  Steven Liu Oct 17 '12 at 10:54
    
@StevenLiu, you should not update the question in repsonse to answers. This appears to make answers irrelevant and will confuse people coming to the question later. However, this is a mistake: (argv[2]-32)*5/9; You need to convert argv[2] to arithemtic type. –  hmjd Oct 17 '12 at 10:56
add comment
char c = "-c";
char f = "-f;

This is a problem. "" means string but you are declaring these variables as char

Use,

char c[] = "-c";
char f[] = "-f";

then compare them using strcmp(argv[1], c).

share|improve this answer
    
how can i fix that, and make the program work? –  Steven Liu Oct 17 '12 at 10:42
    
edited my answer to solve your problem. watch that –  taufique Oct 17 '12 at 10:43
1  
strcmp(argv[1], c) –  Martin James Oct 17 '12 at 10:44
    
I have fixed the program as above, but error still happened –  Steven Liu Oct 17 '12 at 10:53
    
what errors are you watchng? can you specify? Post error message and your new code here. –  taufique Oct 17 '12 at 11:01
add comment
char c = "-c";
char f = "-f;

is wrong. These are not chars, but strings, so store them as char *. And strings must be balanced. (The latter error you could have found yourself.)

if(argv[0] == c)

Here you want

if (strcmp(argv[1], c) == 0)

as argv[0] is the name of the program and strings cannot be compared with ==.

sscanf(s,"%f",&temp_c);

What is s?

temp_c =  (argv[1]-32)*5/9;

No. You are mixing up pointer and float arithmetics.

}else if(argv([0]=f){

See above. BTW: This should give a syntax error from the compiler; easy to spot by yourself.

sscanf(s,"%f",&temp_c);

See above.

temp_c =  argv[1]*9/5+32;

See above.

share|improve this answer
1  
Lesson learnt: you cannot guess programming. You must actually know programming, you must know what every single line of your program does, or it will simply not work. Or worse: it may appear to work but contain latent bugs. –  Lundin Oct 17 '12 at 12:46
add comment

As of revision 3 of your code:

mike@linux-4puc:~> gcc a.c
a.c: In function ‘main’:
a.c:29:16: error: ‘s’ undeclared (first use in this function)
a.c:29:16: note: each undeclared identifier is reported only once for each function it appears in
a.c:30:30: error: invalid operands to binary * (have ‘char *’ and ‘int’)
a.c:33:9: error: ‘f0’ undeclared (first use in this function)
a.c:35:20: error: invalid operands to binary * (have ‘char *’ and ‘int’)
a.c:40:8: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘exit’ [enabled by default]

So let's go through them:

1) Yup, here you use s and it has not been declared anywhere. Read up about sscanf here. The first parameter is a const char *, or a string where we'll find the content. In your case s is not declared. You want to get the temp (or second command line variable) so you need to pass argv[2] here, not s

sscanf(s,"%f",&temp_c);   -->  sscanf(argv[2], "%f", &temp_c);

2) Again, you're using something that has not been declared, this time f0.

else if(f0==strcmp(argv[1],f)){

Looks like you just wanted 0 like in the first if, so just remove the f

3) Invalid operands to binary * means you're trying to do math on a string and the compiler doesn't know what to do. The arguments, argv[x], are strings no matter if you pass numbers or not so this:

temp_c =  argv[1]*9/5+32;

Is not valid. You already did the conversion too! That's what the sscanf() did for you, so the value you want is temp_c, not argv[1]

4) incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function in this case means that you're trying to use a standard function exit() but didn't include the correct header file. Including <stdlib.h> will fix that.


That takes care of the warnings and errors.. however your code still has some logic and conformance problems:

printf("%f celsius = %f fahrenheit", &temp_c, argv[2]);

This is not what you want. Don't pass the address of temp_c, you want the value, not the value of the pointer. Read up on the ampersand in C, you can't just throw these around wherever you want to.

The second issue with this statement is argv[2] is not a number, it's a string (we went over this before) so you have to use the string format specificer %s not the float %f. Same issues in both your printf's.

One more issue, your main function should return an int, that's what int main(... means. Before you leave the function you should make sure there's a return 0; or exit(0); You have one, but only if you fall into the else case. You should just have one, unconditionally, at the end of the function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.