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<script type="text/javascript">
window.onload = init;

function init() {
    var button = document.getElementById("searchbutton");
    button.onclick = handleButtonClick;
}

function handleButtonClick(e) {
    var textinput = document.getElementById("searchinput");
    var searchterm = textinput.value;
    window.location.assign("http://www.google.com/testing/" + searchterm)
}
</script>

<input type="text" name="search" id="searchinput">
<button type="button" id="searchbutton">Ara</button>

This code block takes a user input and goes a new page with that.

When user pressed enter key, I want to make same thing with that submit button. I find something on web but they are all related with jquery.

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If you don't mind dropping support for IE, you can bind [input#searchinput].onchange to handleButtonClick() too; if you don't like that, listen to [input#searchinput].onkeyup and check if [Enter] (keyCode: 13) is pressed. –  Passerby Oct 17 '12 at 10:46
    
Could you give full code? –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 10:56
    
Alright, I've added an answer. –  Passerby Oct 17 '12 at 11:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you should use a tag, with a Submit button, and use the .onSubmit() event of the form. This event will be triggered both when you click and when you hit the Return (Enter) key.

An example JS code (tested in JSFiddle, just modified a bit your code to add a form) :

<script type="text/javascript">
function processForm(e) {
    if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();

    var textinput = document.getElementById("searchinput");
    var searchterm = textinput.value;
    window.location.assign("http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=" + searchterm)

    return false; // Block form
}

var form = document.getElementById('searchForm');

if (form.attachEvent) { form.attachEvent("submit", processForm); } 
else { form.addEventListener("submit", processForm); }​
</script>
<form id="searchForm">
<input type="text" name="search" id="searchinput">
<input type="submit">
</form>​

You can watch this code live here : http://jsfiddle.net/UD8FN/

Hugo,

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I'll use it for Opera extension. This will be something like this; urbandictionary.com/define.php?term= will be main url, user's input will go to end of url. Do you have any suggestion for this? –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 11:03
    
Yes, I'll edit my actual answer to show you. –  pistache Oct 17 '12 at 11:10
    
OK, I'll do your answer correct when you done it. –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 11:16
    
Imrahil, I corrected my answer, and attached a JSFiddle, where you can test the code live. I made the version with UrbanDictionary because I don't know Google's command line but it's the same, only a minor change. –  pistache Oct 17 '12 at 11:35
    
I think this a better than the other forms (catching onClick, and keycode 13 events), because you rely on the browser for knowing when the form is submitted. Whatever the way used to submit the form, the JS code will be run. The other methods try to impersonate the onSubmit() event. –  pistache Oct 17 '12 at 11:37

Extending from comment:

An IE-unfriendly solution:

function init() {
    var button = document.getElementById("searchbutton");
    button.onclick = handleButtonClick;
    document.getElementById("searchinput").onchange=handleButtonClick;
}

A common solution:

function init() {
    var button = document.getElementById("searchbutton");
    button.onclick = handleButtonClick;
    document.getElementById("searchinput").onkeyup=function(e){
        e=e?e:event;
        if(e.keyCode==13) handleButtonClick();
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you explain what did you done in your code? –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 11:07
    
@Imrahil In the "IE-unfriendly" version, I tell the [input#searchinput] to handle onchange event as if [button#searchbuton] is clicked; In the common version, I tell the [input#searchinput] to listen to onkeyup event, and see if [Enter] (keyCode=13) is pressed, and if it is, run handleButtonClick(). –  Passerby Oct 17 '12 at 11:09
    
Why e=e?e:event; stays there? It's working without it. –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 11:15
    
@Imrahil Well it's for IE compatible. IE would not send event as the first parameter; instead you have to use window.event inside event handler. If you're just doing Opera extension, you can omit that line. –  Passerby Oct 17 '12 at 11:18
    
Yep, I'm doing Opera extension but if you can give more detail (or any article link) about this, I'll grateful to you. –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 11:23
<input type="text" name="search" id="searchinput" onkeydown="if (event.keyCode == 13) handleButtonClick()">
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to use inline script, how can I use it in script tag? –  Imrahil Oct 17 '12 at 11:02

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