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I am working on my first project using TDD and have hit a bit of a brick wall when it comes to inheritance.

For example if I have something like this

public interface IComponent
{
    void MethodA();

    void MethodB();
}

public class Component : IComponent
{
    public virtual void MethodA()
    {
        // Do something
    }

    public virtual void MethodB()
    {
        // Do something
    }
}

public class ExtendedComponent : Component
{
    public override void MethodA()
    {
        base.MethodA();

        // Do something else
    }
}

then I cannot test ExtendedComponent in isolation because it depends on Component.

However, if I use composition to create ExtendedComponent like this

public class ExtendedComponent : IComponent
{
    private readonly IComponent _component;

    public ComponentB(IComponent component)
    {
        _component = component;
    }

    public virtual void MethodA()
    {
        _component.MethodA();

        // Do something else
    }

    public virtual void MethodB()
    {
        _component.MethodB();
    }
}

I can now test ExtendedComponent in isolation by mocking the wrapped IComponent.

The downside of this approach is that if I want to add new methods to IComponent then I have to add the new methods to Component and ExtendedComponent and any other implementations of which there could be many. Using inheritance I could just add the new method to the base Component and it wouldn't break anything else.

I really want to be able to test cleanly so am favouring the composition route but I am concerned that being able to unit test is not a valid reason to always use composition over inheritance. Also adding functionality at the base level will require the creation of lots of tedious delegating methods.

I'd really appreciate some advice on how other people have approached this kind of problem

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2  
I guess, you are misunderstanding a bit a notion of 'isolated' testing. It means, that you test or component without dependency of external components. However, in case of inheritance, base class is NOT external to your scope. It's actually part of you component. –  undefined Oct 17 '12 at 10:49

4 Answers 4

your approach using composition is in all practicallity how most compilers implement inheritance so you gain nothing but pay a heavy cost (a lot of boilerplate code). So stick to the inheritance when there's a is-a relationship and composition when there is a has-a relation ship (those of course are neither gold nor the sole rules)

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You don't need to worry about testing the extended component 'in isolation' because it does not 'depend' on component it IS a component (at least it is in the way you coded it).

All the tests you originally wrote for the component class are still fine and test all the unchanged behaviour in the extended class as well. All you need to do is write new tests that test the added functionality in the extended component.

public class ComponentTests{
  [Fact]
  public void MethodADoesSomething(){
    Assert.xxx(new Component().MethodA());//Tests the component class
  }

  [Fact]
  public void MethodBDoesSomething(){
    Assert.xxx(new Component().MethodB());//Tests the component class
  }
}

public class ExtendedComponentTests{
  [Fact]
  public void MethodADoesSomething(){
    Assert.xxx(new ExtendedComponent().MethodA());//Tests the extended component class
  }
}

You can see from above that MethodA functionality is tested for both the component AND the extended component. While the new functionality is only tested for the ExtendedComponent.

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The key idea here is that one can have inheritance at unit test side too. I use following approach in this scenario. I'll have a parallel inheritance hierarchy of unit test cases. e.g.

[TestClass]
public abstract class IComponentTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethodA()
    {
         // Interface level expectations.
    }
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethodB()
    {
         // Interface level expectations.
    }
}

[TestClass]
public class ComponentTest : IComponentTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethodACustom()
    {
        // Test Component specific test, not general test
    }
    [TestMethod]    
    public void TestMethodBCustom()
    {
        // Test Component specific test, not general test
    }
}
[TestClass]
public class ExtendedComponent : ComponentTest 
{
    public void TestMethodACustom2()
    {
        // Test Component specific test, not general test
    }
}

Each abstract test class or concrete class deals with expectations at it's own level. Thus extensible and maintainable.

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+1 for mentioning test fixture inheritance. It's often an elegant way of unit testing hierarchies of subclasses. However in my experience it requires having a SUT property in your test classes that you instantiate at the relevant level in each test class, which you didn't show in your example. (I wonder what the body of your IComponentTest methods is, which implementation of IComponent do you pick and new up there ?) –  guillaume31 Oct 18 '12 at 8:26

You are correct - using composition over inheritance where it is not appropriate is not the way to go. Based on the information that you have provided here, it is not clear which is better. Ask yourself which one is more appropriate in this situation. By using inheritance, you get polymorphism and virtualization of methods. If you use composition, you are effectively separating your "front-end" logic from the isolated "back-end" logic -- this approach is easier in that changing the underlying component does not have a ripple effect on the rest of the code as inheritance often does.

All in all, this should not affect how you test your code. There are many frameworks for testing available, but this should not affect which design pattern you choose.

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You must have meant that it does not affect the ability to test. Code will be tested differently depending on how it is coded. –  Arturo Hernandez Mar 14 at 15:37

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