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In my C++ program I am required to handle large amount of information. I'm storing this large information in a structure. the structure is..

struct xlsmain
{
    struct sub_parts_of_interface sub_parts[200];
    string name;
    int no_of_subparts;
};

struct sub_parts_of_interface
{
    struct pio_subparts pio[10];
    string name_of_interface;
    string direction; 
    string partition;
    int no_of_ports;
};

struct pio_subparts
{
    struct corners corner[32]; 
    string pio_name;     
};

struct corners
{
    struct file_structure merging_files[50];
    string corner_name;
    int merginf_files_num;
};

struct file_structure
{
    string file_name;
    string file_type;
    struct reportspecs report[20];
};

I'm using new operator to allocate memory to it

struct xlsmain *interface = new xlsmain[60];

On running the program std::bad_alloc error is shown. Plese help!

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2  
AFAIK there's no new operator in C. –  user529758 Oct 17 '12 at 11:08
2  
Your "C program" probably won't even compile. The case would be different for a C++ program, though. –  Christian Rau Oct 17 '12 at 11:08
    
Your code looks like pure C (with some string in there), you should use malloc instead of new. If you want to use new then your struct should be transformed to a class (and then it's going to look like C++) –  zakkak Oct 17 '12 at 11:08
    
@zakkak Well, no need to transform it into a class (which would most probably invalidate his code, anyway, making all the variables private). But you're at least partly right in that the usage of struct inside of variable declarations is unneccessary in C++. –  Christian Rau Oct 17 '12 at 11:10
2  
@zakkak Yes bad_alloc is a run time exception thrown by the C++ standard library. –  john Oct 17 '12 at 11:24
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3 Answers

You are trying to allocate 60 xlsmain which contain 12,000 sub_parts_of_interface which contain 120,000 pio_subparts which contain 3,840,000 corners which contain 192,000,000 file_structure which contain 3,840,000,000 reportspecs, and you have not shown the definition of reportspecs. So you are trying to allocate 3.8 billion of something and are running out of memory.

That is because the system you are running on does not have enough memory to hold the objects you are trying to allocate.

If those structures contain arrays because the structures might hold those objects, but they usually do not contain the maximums, then get rid of the arrays and replace them std::vector (in C++) or pointers (in C or C++). With either method, you will use just space for the actual objects needed plus some accounting overhead, instead of using space for the maximum theoretically possible. std::vector allows you to add elements as needed, and the std::vector application will take care of allocating the needed memory. With pointers, you would have to allocate and free the space yourself.

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1  
+1. It's a lot worse than 64 million because of all that auxiliary stuff. If reportspec contains but one char, 60*sizeof(xlsmain) is 7.2 gigabytes, which is already huge. If sizeof(reportspec) is a bit larger, say 128 bytes, 60*sizeof(xlsmain) becomes a whopping 460.7 gig. –  David Hammen Oct 17 '12 at 11:22
1  
@DavidHammen: Yes, it took me a few revisions to get all the levels accounted for correctly. There are 3.8 billion objects just in those shown! If the program is running on a 32-bit system, it probably overflowed the size type and was just lucky it got a value that reported unable to allocate memory, instead of allocating a small amount and overrunning it. bad_alloc is the wrong exception for this; it should be very_bad_alloc. –  Eric Postpischil Oct 17 '12 at 11:24
    
I would recommend using std::vector as it does all the memory management (re-allocation, destruction etc) for you, with only a small overhead. –  Paresh Oct 17 '12 at 11:26
    
@EricPostpischil +1 for the joke –  john Oct 17 '12 at 11:27
    
thank you for the suggestions and the figures. but with vectors i am not able to store data into nested structure like this –  Cprog Oct 17 '12 at 11:51
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It's simple enough. You haven't got enough memory. Either buy some more memory or redesign your code. I would suggest that your replace your arrays with zero length vectors. That way you only need to grow the vectors to the size you actually need, instead of having a fixed size always. That will use less memory and be more flexible as well. For instance

  struct pio_subparts
   {
    vector<corners> corner; 
    string pio_name;     
   };

More precise advice isn't possible without knowing exactly what you are trying to do.

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1  
In this case the problem is in syntax and general understanding of C/C++ than running out of memory –  jhonkola Oct 17 '12 at 11:09
    
@jhonkola He's getting a std::bad_alloc exception therefore, whatever the issues with the code he has posted, he has successfully compiled and run a C++ program. He's also trying to allocate a very large structure. I think he's running out of memory. –  john Oct 17 '12 at 11:11
    
The bit about not having enough memory is very likely correct. ,It's allocting 192,000,000 file structures each of which contains string and 20 copies of whatever reportspecs is. –  jcoder Oct 17 '12 at 11:12
    
If only a small number of the array slots are used then vectors might use less memory... –  jcoder Oct 17 '12 at 11:15
2  
Buying more memory is not an option. The only option is to redesign the code. –  David Hammen Oct 17 '12 at 11:29
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@H2CO3 is right.

In pure C use something like this: http://www.elook.org/programming/c/malloc.html

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But malloc will not solve the underlying problem. Her will get NULL because of memory exhaustion. The underlying problem is that the structure is to bit to fit into memory. –  rioki Oct 17 '12 at 12:33
    
Yes, @rioki, you are completely right. When I posted this comment it was "In my C program", not in my "In my C++ program"... and all this structs, not classes. So I did't read code meticulously. Thanks to Eric Postpischil, he was more careful. =) –  parkee Oct 17 '12 at 17:44
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