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How do I wrap an immutable class in a mutable one?
For example wrapping Integer and String and create MutableInteger and MutableString.

It seems that there are various ways available for doing this. I want to do this with less effort on coding side while maintaining readability.

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closed as not a real question by NimChimpsky, T.J. Crowder, phant0m, emory, Jivings Oct 17 '12 at 12:32

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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"Most clean" (aka "best") questions are typically off-topic for SO: stackoverflow.com/faq In your case, I expect if you just rephrase ("How do I wrap an immutable class in a mutable one") you'll be fine. Add a concrete example. –  T.J. Crowder Oct 17 '12 at 12:06
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If you don't mind can you please give more explanation. –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Oct 17 '12 at 12:07
    
Thanks for your comments. I'll add details shortly. –  MBZ Oct 17 '12 at 12:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Reference a new instance to get it done .

To demonstrate this behaviour, we'll use java.lang.String as the immutable class and java.awt.Point as the mutable class.

    Point myPoint = new Point( 0, 0 );
    System.out.println( myPoint );
    myPoint.setLocation( 1.0, 0.0 );
    System.out.println( myPoint );

    String myString = new String( "old String" );
    System.out.println( myString );
    myString.replaceAll( "old", "new" );
    System.out.println( myString );

In case you can't see what the output is, here it is:

    java.awt.Point[0.0, 0.0]
    java.awt.Point[1.0, 0.0]
    old String
    old String

We are only looking at a single instance of each object, but we can see that the contents of myPoint has changed, but the contents of myString did not. To show what happens when we try to change the value of myString, we'll extend the previous example.

    String myString = new String( "old String" );
    System.out.println( myString );
    myString = new String( "new String" );
    System.out.println( myString );

The output from this is:

    old String
    new String

Now we find that the value displayed by the myString variable has changed. We have defined immutable objects as being unable to change in value, so what is happening? Let's extend the example again to watch the myString variable closer.

    String myString = new String( "old String" );
    String myCache = myString;
    System.out.println( "equal: " + myString.equals( myCache ) );
    System.out.println( "same:  " + ( myString == myCache ) );

    myString = "not " + myString;
    System.out.println( "equal: " + myString.equals( myCache ) );
    System.out.println( "same:  " + ( myString == myCache ) );

The result from executing this is:

    equal: true
    same:  true
    equal: false
    same:  false

What this shows is that variable myString is referencing a new instance of the String class. The contents of the object didn't change; we discarded the instance and changed our reference to a new one with new contents.

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You may have a mutable companion class that sees the internals of the immutable object and provides public mutator methods. The best way to achieve this is to make the mutable companion a nested class inside the immutable class.

However, don't expect to actually mutate JDK's standard classes like Integer or String. That is out of the question. You can only write facade classes that replace their internal Strings or Integers with new intstances upon mutation.

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