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I have a static class which calls a static Logger class,

e.g

static class DoesStuffStatic
{
  public static void DoStuff()
  {
    try
    {
      //something
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
      //do stuff; 
      Logger.Log(e);
    }
  }
}

static class Logger
{
  public static void Log(Exception e)
  {
     //do stuff here
  }
}

How do I inject the Logger into my static class?

Note: I've read http://stackoverflow.com/questions/743951/help-with-dependency-injection-in-net, but this seems to use an instance logger.

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up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can't inject a static logger. You have to either change it to an instance logger (if you can), or wrap it in an instance logger (that will call the static). Also it is fairly hard to inject anything to a static class (because you don't control the static constructor in any way) - that's why I tend to pass all the objects I want to inject as parameters.

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This is not necessarily so. As long as your static logger exposes a method for:

  • Injection of the classes you WANT injected, or
  • Injection of the DI Container in an appropriate method call prior to running it (say in something like the asp.net global.asax Application_Start method), then you should be fine.

Here's an example. Take the following class for DI:

 public class Logger : ILogger
    {
        public void Log(string stringToLog)
        {
           Console.WriteLine(stringToLog);
        }
    }

    public interface ILogger
    {
        void Log(string stringToLog);
    }

And here's our static class which needs a logger:

public static class SomeStaticClass
    {
        private static IKernel _diContainer;
        private static ILogger _logger;

        public static void Init(IKernel dIcontainer)
        {
            _diContainer = dIcontainer;
            _logger = _diContainer.Get<ILogger>();
        }


        public static void Log(string stringToLog)
        {
            _logger.Log(stringToLog);
        }


    }

Now, in a global startup for your app (in this case, in my global.asax.cs), you can instantiate your DI Container, then hand that off to your static class.

public class Global : Ninject.Web.NinjectHttpApplication
    {

        protected override IKernel CreateKernel()
        {
            return Container;
        }


        static IKernel Container
        {
            get
            {
                var standardKernel = new StandardKernel();
                standardKernel.Bind<ILogger>().To<Logger>();
                return standardKernel;
            }

        }

        void Application_Start(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            SomeStaticClass.Init(Container);
            SomeStaticClass.Log("Dependency Injection with Statics is totally possible");

        }

And presto! You are now up and running with DI in your static classes.

Hope that helps someone. I am re-working an application which uses a LOT of static classes, and we've been using this successfully for a while now.

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1  
Looks to me more like dependency resolution than dependency injection. The static class now have knowledge of the dependency framework. But it would not be hard to adapt it to avoid it. (Resolve in application_start and initialize with resolved dependencies, rather than supplying the resolver in initialization.) – Frédéric Sep 2 '14 at 15:52
    
The question is about injecting a static class into a static class. This deals with how to inject a non-static instance into a static class. This looks like a response to the following statement in the previous answer: " Also it is fairly hard to inject anything to a static class " – Andy Thomas May 11 '15 at 15:25

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