Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the most common sparse matrix format?

I've read of Harwell Boing format, Yale format and although is not explicitly a sparse matrix format, the SVMLight by Thorsten Joachims which exploit the sparsity.

What should be the simplest to write a exception-safe parser in C++?

share|improve this question
    
SVMLight is quite easy to parse, but it's not standardized; I've seen files that assume 1-based column indices and zero-based ones. What do you need this for? –  larsmans Oct 17 '12 at 14:29
    
Why down vote? It's a useful question. I know SVMlight is easy to parse but I want to write a parser that works on the most common format rather than spending time and effort for an unused format. –  linello Oct 17 '12 at 14:39
2  
Do you mean in memory or on disk? Compressed row storage is possibly the most common spare matrix format for a program to work with and is easy to implement and iterate through. As for on disk, well use whatever your source provides, I have had good success with the Matrix Market format as used by the Florida Sparse Matrix Collection –  111111 Oct 17 '12 at 14:42
    
Again, why do you need this? There are various formats in use in various fields (e.g. SVMlight is popular in machine learning) for either computations or storage. You should write a parser for the format that you expect your application to handle. –  larsmans Oct 17 '12 at 15:00
    
I need to load sparse matrices from file in memory using Eigen SparseMatrix because I have to work with linear system, solvers etc, but I want to give to the user the possibility to cope with famous formats and not inventing a new format, constraining the user to work with conversion scripts or similar... –  linello Oct 17 '12 at 15:04
show 2 more comments

closed as not constructive by larsmans, Bo Persson, angainor, Kjuly, Burhan Khalid Oct 18 '12 at 4:39

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

Do you mean in memory or on disk?

Compressed row storage is possibly the most common spare matrix format for a program to work with and is easy to implement and iterate through.

As for on disk, well use whatever your source provides, I have had good success with the Matrix Market format as used by the Florida Sparse Matrix Collection

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.