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Controllers:

var ProductsCtrl = function ($scope) {
  $scope.products = [ {name: 'one'}, {name: 'two'}, {name:'three'} ];
};

var ProductCtrl = function ($scope) {
  $scope. // How do I access the current product name?
};

view:

<ul ng-controller='ProductsCtrl'>
  <li ng-repeat='product in products' ng-controller='ProductCtrl'>
  </li>
</ul>
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The current product is accessible in the scope as "product" in your case.

if you repeat something like this :

ng-repeat="item in items" your child controller will have "item" in the scope.

So in your example :

<ul ng-controller='ProductsCtrl'>
  <li ng-repeat='product in products' ng-controller='ProductCtrl'>
    {{product.name}}
  </li>
</ul>
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Yes - but what if you are making a general feature directive intended to be composable? In that case it would be bad to impose restrictions on naming of scope variables in the directive. ng-repeat should allow 'sibling directives' access to the names of the current element and the current list (perhaps similar to $first/$last). Judging by the source it would be very easy to add this to ngRepeatDirective.. –  LOAS Mar 14 '13 at 8:28
    
Sibling directives do have access to both 'product' and 'products' as long as one of the sibling directives do not define an isolate scope. –  ganaraj Mar 14 '13 at 13:19
    
You misunderstood me. The sibling directives have access, yes. But what if sibling directives are written by somebody else who don't know the names of the 'element in collection' variable naming in the ng-repeat attribute in markup? This information (the variable naming) exists in the repeat-directive, but is not exposed to sibling directives. Sibling directives currently have to parse this information out of the ngRepeat attribute - which is slightly bothersome. Feel free to correct me if there is a better way :) –  LOAS Mar 16 '13 at 17:16
    
This is a question by itself and perhaps it cant be done justice by answering it here in the comments section. But, in short, any directive needs to define a contract / API through which it should define a way of passing it the information it needs. IT should only be bothered with this in most cases. If you somehow do need to interact with another directive then that directive needs to define a directive controller. –  ganaraj Mar 16 '13 at 19:49
    
True - my point above is somewhat off topic now that I revisit the question. –  LOAS Mar 18 '13 at 9:58
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@ganaraj already provided the correct answer. But I'd like to point out that in your example, you probably don't need to declare a controller in the <li> element. The child scopes created by ng-repeat for each product have access to the ProductCtrl controller. You should only need

<li ng-repeat='product in products'>

See also section "Controller Inheritance Example" on the Understanding the Controller Component page.

You can add methods to ProdctsCtrl's $scope that take a product argument, which could then be called inside the ng-repeat. E.g., in your controller:

var ProductsCtrl = function ($scope) {
   ...
   $scope.totalPrice = function(product) {
      return product.price * product.quantity;
   }
}

In your HTML:

<li ng-repeat='product in products'>
   total cost = {{totalPrice(product)}}
</li>
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Yup, but my controller was reacting to an outside event by an event emitter. events.on('event', function () { $scope.product.sell() }); –  Pickels Oct 18 '12 at 17:39
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