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I want to use a HSM (hardware security module) to create a signature of a XML file. I did a bit of research and am now a bit confused, though.

Can you please clarify those questions:

  1. What is meant with a key handle in JCE? I have read about it, that it is just a handle and the key is stored somewhere else. How can that be? From my understanding I either load the key into memory and use it, or the signing is done completely by a HSM and I only get the result, right?
  2. Does the PKCS#11 standard define a way so that the signature is generated in the HSM? I've read about tokens, but I am not sure about signing.
  3. The featurelist of my HSM states JCE and PKCS#11 separately. What does that mean?
  4. I thought PKCS#11 is a standard, and JCE defines classes to use that standard. Does JCE specify its own protocols?
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1 Answer 1

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  1. What is meant with a key handle in JCE?
    A key handle (in JCE, PKCS#11, or most other cryptographic APIs) is simply a reference that enables you to use a key without seeing its actual value. That is good: you can have the key permanently stored in a secure place (e.g. an HSM) with the assurance that nobody will be able to copy it and run away with it - as it may happen if the key is the application space. Unlike a physical safe though, you can still perform cryptographic operation without running any security risk of key leakage.

  2. Does the PKCS#11 standard define a way so that the signature is generated in the HSM?
    PKCS#11 is a C API for cryptographic tokens. A token is a PKCS#11 abstraction for any device or program that offers services described by such API. The API defines which operations you can perform using the objects inside the PKCS#11 token: some objects are non sensitive, and can be extracted (e.g. public keys); some others are sensitive and can only be used, via handles.
    If you have a handle to an object that supports signing, you can use the C function C_Sign to ask the token to authenticate some data provided by your application. The key does not leave the HSM.

  3. The featurelist of my HSM states JCE and PKCS#11 separately. What does that mean?
    Your HSM supports JCE in the sense that it comes with a native library that qualifies as a Cryptographic Service Provider.
    It supports PKCS#11 in the sense that it comes with a native library that offers a C PKCS#11 API.

  4. I thought PKCS#11 is a standard, and JCE defines classes to use that standard. Does JCE specify its own protocols?
    Indeed PKCS#11 is a standard; but it is not directly usable by languages other than C. You need a mapping layer that translates it into something compatible to your language. A PKCS#11 library (and the physical tokens that it abstracts) can be mapped to a JCE provider.

However, a JCE provider may have nothing to do with PKCS#11.

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Can you provide more info on 1. please! The API I use (XAdES4J, Java) uses a PrivateKey to create a signature. Is that a real key loaded to RAM, or just a handle? How could I - as a user - know? (I'm currently using a keystore only, so I can't just debug into it) –  Andy Oct 22 '12 at 12:44
    
It depends on what backs your KeyStore. If it is PKCS#11 and your provider is your HSM, the key will not be loaded in RAM and will stay inside the HSM. You will only be dealing with the handle to it. –  SquareRootOfTwentyThree Oct 22 '12 at 19:10
    
I'm still not clear on that handle-topic. Lets assume I have a private key "abcde" stored in my HSM slot 7. That gives me a handle with the id 7. Now I want to use that private key to create a signature. I see only two options: a) get the private key associated to the handle 7 and create the signature myself (that means knowing the secret, "abcde") or b) transfer the content for the signature to the HSM and tell it to use slot 7, and the HSM returns with the created signature. Right? Am I missing something here? –  Andy Oct 23 '12 at 11:51
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Option b) is the correct scenario. The HSM will not release the private key under normal circumstances if the key was created correctly. –  SquareRootOfTwentyThree Oct 23 '12 at 17:56

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