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I'm having a issue with the background-image transition using CSS3. The problem is that it occasionally flickers the first time you roll over it. If you roll-over it the second time it's no problem makes a smooth fade-in/fade-out from one to the other.

I've searched google about this issue found a bunch of people having the same problem. But they resolved the issue by using 1 background image and then using background-position to hide it till you roll over it.

I can't do that with mine because I need the smooth fade-in/fade-out animation from 1 image to the other (it's 2 images of the same button with different colors and thingies.) If I use background-position it'll come from underneath the button on it's place. I need a fade-in fade-out animation.

So I'm guessing this issue happens because of the image not being loaded that, and that it needs a fraction of a second to load.

Here's the code:

    .btn-denken{
        background:url(../images/btn-denken.png);
        width:219px;
        height:40px;
        float:left;
        -webkit-transition: all 0.3s ease-in-out 0s;
        -moz-transition: all 0.3s ease-in-out 0s;
        -ms-transition: all 0.3s ease-in-out 0s;
        -o-transition: all 0.3s ease-in-out 0s;
        transition: all 0.3s ease-in-out 0s;
    }

    .btn-denken:hover{
        background:url(../images/btn-denken-hover.png);
    }

Help is very much appriciated! Thank you!

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3 Answers 3

The trick is to make sure that the images you want to do transition on are already loaded by CSS, that's why putting them in the document as dummy's and loading them through CSS is the solution.

In the example below I have 4 images (0.jpg - 3.jpg), and if I would now set the class '.landing-1' on my document (html), the images transition properly.

In my CSS:

body {
    -webkit-transition: background 1s;
    background: url(0.jpg) no-repeat center center / cover fixed;
}
.dummy-image {
    position: absolute;
    left: -100%; /* to hide the dummy */
}

Simple javascript to cache the images:

var images = [],
    load = function() {
        $('head').append('<style>html.landing-'.concat(this.index, ' body.landing, .dummy-image-', this.index, ' { background: url(', this.src, ') no-repeat center center / cover fixed; }</style>'));
        $('body').append('<div class="dummy-image dummy-image-'.concat(this.index, '">'));
      };

for(var i=0; i<4; i++) {
    var image = document.createElement('img');
    image.src = i + '.jpg');
    image.index = i;
    image.onload = load;
    images.push(image);
}
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Perhaps you can use two separate containers in the same area using absolute positioning and z-index. Set the two different background images one per container, and then when you hover just make the opacity of the top container to be fully transparent.

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I had the same problem: I wanted to use transitioning to fade between images. Using a 2-in-1 image (or a sprite) and using css to change it's position on hover doesn't work because you end up seeing the image scrolling side-side or up-down.

(FYI, you're correct - the blink occurs because it takes a moment to load your image but the transition has already begun from the moment you hover. After you've hovered once, the image has loaded so it won't happen again until you reload the page.)

Here is a purely HTML and CSS solution:

  • Create a containing div
  • Place an anchor tag and image tag within this container
  • Set a background image on the anchor tag (this should be the image you want displayed on page-load)
  • The image tag should be the image you want to display on hover and needs a z-index applied to bring it behind your anchor tag

After much experimentation, I arrived at the following solution: (Demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/jmtFK/)

HTML:

<div class="button" id="specific">
    <a href="" class="link" target=""></a>
    <img>
</div>

CSS:

.button {
    position: relative;
}

.button a {
    display: block;
    width: px;
    height: px;
    background: url() no-repeat;

    -webkit-opacity: 1;
    -moz-opacity: 1;
    opacity: 1;

    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.2s ease;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0.2s ease;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0.2s ease;
    -o-transition: opacity 0.2s ease;
    transition: opacity 0.2s ease;
}

.button a:hover {
    -webkit-opacity: 0;
    -moz-opacity: 0;
    opacity: 0;

    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -o-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
}

.button img {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    z-index: -1;

    -webkit-opacity: 0;
    -moz-opacity: 0;
    opacity: 0;

    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -o-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
}

.button a:hover + img {
    -webkit-opacity: 1;
    -moz-opacity: 1;
    opacity: 1;

    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    -o-transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
    transition: opacity 0.3s ease;
}

I initially didn't have my z-indexed image set to transparent and found that the edges of it appeared around the outside of the link image. This was ugly so I applied opacity: 0.

I also added CSS transitions for "hover in" and "hover out". (Basically, the transition settings applied to a certain CSS state dictate how it transitions to that state. eg the transition settings applied to .button a take effect when button a:hover is no longer applicable.

I hope that helps.

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