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I have a simple API setup using ServiceStack. I use the following code to get it running:

namespace TheGuest.Test
{
    [DataContract]
    [Description("A sample web service.")]
    public class Greet
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

    [DataContract]
    public class GreetResponse
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string Result { get; set; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// An example of a very basic web service.
    /// </summary>
    public class GreetService : IService<Greet>
    {
        public object Execute(Greet request)
        {
            return new GreetResponse { Result = "Hello " + request.Name };
        }
    }

    public static class Constants
    {
        public const string DefaultNamespaceV1 = "http://my/custom/namespace";
    }

    public class MyAppHost : AppHostBase
    {
        // Tell Service Stack the name of your application and where to find your web services.
        public MyAppHost()
            : base("My Web Services", typeof(GreetService).Assembly)
        {
        }

        public override void Configure(Container container)
        {
            SetConfig(new EndpointHostConfig { WsdlServiceNamespace = Constants.DefaultNamespaceV1 });

            // Register user-defined REST-ful URLs.
            Routes
                .Add<Greet>("/hello")
                .Add<Greet>("/hello/{Name}")
                .Add<Greet>("/hello/{Name*}");
        }
    }

    public class MvcApplication : HttpApplication
    {
        protected void Application_Start()
        {
            new MyAppHost().Init();
        }
    }
}

And adding the following line to the AssemblyInfo.cs:

[assembly: ContractNamespace("http://my/custom/namespace", ClrNamespace = "TheGuest.Test")]

It will generate the following WSDL:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<wsdl:definitions name="Soap12" 
    targetNamespace="http://my/custom/namespace" 
    xmlns:svc="http://my/custom/namespace" 
    xmlns:tns="http://my/custom/namespace" 

    xmlns:wsdl="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/" 
    xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/" 
    xmlns:soap12="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap12/" 
    xmlns:wsu="http://docs.oasis-open.org/wss/2004/01/oasis-200401-wss-wssecurity-utility-1.0.xsd" 
    xmlns:soapenc="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/encoding/" 
    xmlns:wsam="http://www.w3.org/2007/05/addressing/metadata" 
    xmlns:wsa="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/08/addressing" 
    xmlns:wsp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/09/policy" 
    xmlns:wsap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/08/addressing/policy" 
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
    xmlns:msc="http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2005/12/wsdl/contract" 
    xmlns:wsaw="http://www.w3.org/2006/05/addressing/wsdl" 
    xmlns:wsa10="http://www.w3.org/2005/08/addressing" 
    xmlns:wsx="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/09/mex">

    <wsdl:types>
        <xs:schema xmlns:tns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2003/10/Serialization/" attributeFormDefault="qualified" elementFormDefault="qualified" targetNamespace="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2003/10/Serialization/" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <xs:element name="anyType" nillable="true" type="xs:anyType" />
  <xs:element name="anyURI" nillable="true" type="xs:anyURI" />
  <xs:element name="base64Binary" nillable="true" type="xs:base64Binary" />
  <xs:element name="boolean" nillable="true" type="xs:boolean" />
  <xs:element name="byte" nillable="true" type="xs:byte" />
  <xs:element name="dateTime" nillable="true" type="xs:dateTime" />
  <xs:element name="decimal" nillable="true" type="xs:decimal" />
  <xs:element name="double" nillable="true" type="xs:double" />
  <xs:element name="float" nillable="true" type="xs:float" />
  <xs:element name="int" nillable="true" type="xs:int" />
  <xs:element name="long" nillable="true" type="xs:long" />
  <xs:element name="QName" nillable="true" type="xs:QName" />
  <xs:element name="short" nillable="true" type="xs:short" />
  <xs:element name="string" nillable="true" type="xs:string" />
  <xs:element name="unsignedByte" nillable="true" type="xs:unsignedByte" />
  <xs:element name="unsignedInt" nillable="true" type="xs:unsignedInt" />
  <xs:element name="unsignedLong" nillable="true" type="xs:unsignedLong" />
  <xs:element name="unsignedShort" nillable="true" type="xs:unsignedShort" />
  <xs:element name="char" nillable="true" type="tns:char" />
  <xs:simpleType name="char">
    <xs:restriction base="xs:int" />
  </xs:simpleType>
  <xs:element name="duration" nillable="true" type="tns:duration" />
  <xs:simpleType name="duration">
    <xs:restriction base="xs:duration">
      <xs:pattern value="\-?P(\d*D)?(T(\d*H)?(\d*M)?(\d*(\.\d*)?S)?)?" />
      <xs:minInclusive value="-P10675199DT2H48M5.4775808S" />
      <xs:maxInclusive value="P10675199DT2H48M5.4775807S" />
    </xs:restriction>
  </xs:simpleType>
  <xs:element name="guid" nillable="true" type="tns:guid" />
  <xs:simpleType name="guid">
    <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
      <xs:pattern value="[\da-fA-F]{8}-[\da-fA-F]{4}-[\da-fA-F]{4}-[\da-fA-F]{4}-[\da-fA-F]{12}" />
    </xs:restriction>
  </xs:simpleType>
  <xs:attribute name="FactoryType" type="xs:QName" />
  <xs:attribute name="Id" type="xs:ID" />
  <xs:attribute name="Ref" type="xs:IDREF" />
</xs:schema>
<xs:schema xmlns:tns="http://my/custom/namespace" elementFormDefault="qualified" targetNamespace="http://my/custom/namespace" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <xs:complexType name="Greet">
    <xs:sequence>
      <xs:element minOccurs="0" name="Name" nillable="true" type="xs:string" />
    </xs:sequence>
  </xs:complexType>
  <xs:element name="Greet" nillable="true" type="tns:Greet" />
</xs:schema>
    </wsdl:types>



    <wsdl:message name="GreetIn">
        <wsdl:part name="parameters" element="tns:Greet" />
    </wsdl:message>

    <wsdl:portType name="ISyncReply">

    </wsdl:portType>

    <wsdl:portType name="IOneWay">
    <wsdl:operation name="Greet">
        <wsdl:input message="svc:GreetIn" />
    </wsdl:operation>
    </wsdl:portType>

    <wsdl:binding name="WSHttpBinding_ISyncReply" type="svc:ISyncReply">
        <soap12:binding transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http" />

    </wsdl:binding>

    <wsdl:binding name="WSHttpBinding_IOneWay" type="svc:IOneWay">
        <soap12:binding transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http" />
        <wsdl:operation name="Greet">
      <soap:operation soapAction="http://schemas.servicestack.net/types/Greet" style="document" />
      <wsdl:input>
        <soap:body use="literal" />
      </wsdl:input>
    </wsdl:operation>
    </wsdl:binding>

    <wsdl:service name="SyncReply">
        <wsdl:port name="WSHttpBinding_ISyncReply" binding="svc:WSHttpBinding_ISyncReply">
            <soap:address location="http://localhost:50472/test/soap12" />
        </wsdl:port>
    </wsdl:service>

    <wsdl:service name="AsyncOneWay">
        <wsdl:port name="WSHttpBinding_IOneWay" binding="svc:WSHttpBinding_IOneWay">
            <soap:address location="http://localhost:50472/test/soap12" />
        </wsdl:port>
    </wsdl:service>

</wsdl:definitions>

When I add this service via Visual Studio 2010, I get 2 clients. One is called "SyncReplyClient" which has no methods I can call and the other is called "OneWayClient" with a "Greet" method. But as the names imply, I would like to use the SyncReplyClient since I need the response.

How do I achieve this?

On a side note, the OneWayClient throws an ProtocolException with the following message: "The one-way operation returned a non-null message with Action=''." which does not bother me as much since I don't want to use the OneWayClient but it's strange none the less.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried to change "public object Execute(Greet request)" to " public GreetResponse Execute(Greet request)"? –  Yann Olaf Oct 17 '12 at 15:15
    
I can't since IService<Greet> states that Execute should return an object. –  TheGuest Oct 17 '12 at 15:19
    
Is there a reason you are doing this through an MVC application instead of using the built Functionality of WCF web services? –  Chad Dec 20 '12 at 14:16

3 Answers 3

Make sure you read about SOAP Limitations when creating Services that you want to consume by SOAP. i.e. You need to keep a single XSD/WSDL namespace. E.g. You can change the default WSDL Namespace in your AppConfig with:

SetConfig(new EndpointHostConfig {
    WsdlServiceNamespace = "http://my.new.namespace.com/types",
});

This sets what WSDL/XSD namespace gets used on the generated WSDL page. You also need to match this custom XSD namespace with your [DataContract] DTOs by specifying a namespace for each DataContract which you can do by either specifying manually on each

[DataContract(Namespace="http://my.new.namespace.com/types")]

or you can use specify the

 [assembly: ContractNamespace("http://my/custom/namespace", 
            ClrNamespace = "TheGuest.Test")] 

to set it on a number of DTO's under a shared C# namespace.

Also a few things have changed recently, we've added the New API and added different attributes to allow you annotate your services (that will appear on the /metadata and Api Docs/Swagger pages). Taking account of these changes the new way to create your service is:

[DataContract]
[Api("A sample web service.")]
public class Greet
{
    [DataMember]
    [ApiMember("The name of the person you wish to greet")]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

[DataContract]
public class GreetResponse
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Result { get; set; }
}

public class GreetService : Service
{
    public GreetResponse Any(Greet request)
    {
        return new GreetResponse { Result = "Hello " + request.Name };
    }
}

Telling ServiceStack what the Services Response Type is

In order for ServiceStack to determine what the Response Type of your service is, you need to provide any of the below hints:

Using a strong type return type

Your services can either return an object or now a ResponseDto type, e.g:

public class GreetService : Service
{
    //1. Using Object
    public object Any(Greet request)
    {
        return new GreetResponse { Result = "Hello " + request.Name };
    }

    //2. Above service with a strong response type
    public GreetResponse Any(Greet request)
    {
        return new GreetResponse { Result = "Hello " + request.Name };
    }
}

If you use option 2) ServiceStack will assume a GreetResponse type.

Use the IReturn marker interface

[DataContract]
public class Greet : IReturn<GreetResponse> { ... }

Another advantage of using a Marker interface is that it provides a more succinct client API, e.g:

GreetResponse response = client.Send(new Greet { Name = "World!" });

If you didn't have the Marker interface the client API would've been:

GreetResponse response = client.Send<GreetResponse>(new Greet { Name = "World!" });

Use a typeof(RequestDto).Name + 'Response' naming convention

If your services have an object response type and no marker interface than you can use the name {RequestDto}Response naming convention to tell ServiceStack what the Response type is.

Note: For ServiceStack to be able to find the Response type it needs to be in the same namespace as the Request DTO. Also every Request and Response DTO should be uniquely named, this is what lets you call a ServiceStack service with just the Name of the Request DTO and not the full namespace.

share|improve this answer
    
is there any documentation on the Api and ApiMember attribute? Could not find it in ServiceStack wiki and the Internet. –  Gan Dec 28 '12 at 8:52
1  
The attributes are pretty self explanatory, you just decorate your DTOs with them, here's an example of marking up your DTO with these attributes. –  mythz Dec 28 '12 at 9:42

Is there a reason why you are referencing the service and generating a proxy class? (Sorry for asking for clarification but I don't have enough prestige to post a comment on the question.)

If it's your first ServiceStack service then you should read about how it is a different paradigm than WCF. Here is a quick summary.

The great thing about SS is that you don't need to generate proxies and you can focus on transferring data instead of doing remote actions. Just have a DLL that specifies the DTOs and that DLL is referenced both by the service project and the client projects.

This enables you to use the built in service clients (JSON/SOAP/etc) to communicate with the service. It takes a little while to get your head around the differences but once you get how ServiceStack is different (especially in regards to calling the service from Javascript or other non-C# clients) and you need to refactor your service layer without regenerating proxies then you will see why it's better.

Sorry if you have a particular need to generate the client proxy and this doesn't answer the question; this link shows how easy it is to get by with the generic clients and I strongly recommend taking that approach unless there is some particular reason to do the SOAP generation.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason I want it to work via the service reference method via Visual Studio is so that I can build a client that does not need any DLL reference. In the end other developers need to work with this API and it's up to them what environment and language they use. Maintaining a DLL is not something I want to do. –  TheGuest Oct 18 '12 at 7:26
1  
Fair enough. I've tried to figure it out (to no avail -- getting the same as you) but I do notice that when I add a service reference the server is throwing three exceptions: NotFoundHttpHandler Request not found: /test/api/soap12/_vti_bin/ListData.svc/$metadata Request not found: /test/api/soap12/$metadata Request not found: /test/api/soap12/mex –  mikkelfishman Oct 18 '12 at 22:05
1  
When you use my code you need to set the namespaces via the AssemblyInfo.cs like this: [assembly: ContractNamespace("my/custom/namespace";, ClrNamespace = "TheGuest.Test")] then you can add a reference via Visual Studio, I will update my post. –  TheGuest Oct 23 '12 at 8:13

I found it!

I checked the examples of ServiceStack and they work, but my program don't.

The difference is that the operation (SayHello) and the response (SayHelloResponse) were not in the same namespace (My.Application.Operations and MyApplication.Responses).

When I put them in the same namespace, it works, my service is no longer a "OneWay" but a "SyncReply".

share|improve this answer

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