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I need to go through an array from the middle outwords.

var array = [a,b,c,d,e];

I would need to print in this order: c,d,b,e,a

I have already split the array in half, first going forward and then going backwards which is already an improvement, but I really need to go one on each side till the end of the array on each side.

Say I want to start in the middle. I have the following before the loop statement, condition, and I can't seem to figure out the third part to switch one on each side incrementally.

for (var i = Math.floor(array.length/2); i >= 0 || i < array.length; i?){
//Do Something here.
}

Does anyone know how to do this? Obviously I can't seem to test this in this condition.

Thanks

I modified the answer below (Thanks so much) to come up with this function. It allows to start from anywhere in the array and choose the direction to go. I am sure it could be written more elegantly. There is also a safety for wrong index numbers.

var array = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e"];

function processArrayMiddleOut(array, startIndex, direction){
    if (startIndex < 0){ 
        startIndex = 0;
    }
    else if ( startIndex > array.length){
        startIndex = array.lenght-1;
    };

    var newArray = [];

    var i = startIndex;

    if (direction === 'right'){
        var j = i +1;
        while (j < array.length || i >= 0 ){
            if (i >= 0) newArray.push(array[i]);
            if (j < array.length) newArray.push(array[j]);
            i--;
            j++;                
        };
    }
    else if(direction === 'left'){
        var j = i - 1;
        while (j >= 0 || i < array.length ){
            if (i < array.length) newArray.push(array[i]);
            if (j >= 0) newArray.push(array[j]);
            i++;
            j--;                
        };
    };

    return newArray;            
}    

var result = processArrayMiddleOut(array, 2, 'left');

alert(result.toString());

http://jsfiddle.net/amigoni/cqCuZ/

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4  
What have you tried? Where did it go wrong? –  SomeKittens Oct 17 '12 at 15:22
    
I solved your problem with just one loop. Check my answer below. –  Aadit M Shah Oct 17 '12 at 16:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Two counters, one going up, other going down:

var array = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e"];
var newArray = [];

var i = Math.ceil(array.length/2);
var j = i - 1;

while (j >= 0)
{
    newArray.push(array[j--]);
    if (i < array.length) newArray.push(array[i++]);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/X9cQL/

share|improve this answer
    
This looks very good. I am adding some modifications so that you can start from anywhere in the array and also pick the direction you want to start from. Say startIndex 2 go right first. –  Leonardo Amigoni Oct 17 '12 at 20:30

So I decided to revisit this, not feeling very satisfied with the first answer I gave. I was positive there would be some relationship between the index numbers when the data is successfully reordered; I found that pattern in the addition of the iteration number to the last item position.

For our initial array, we'll use the following: ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'].

Our starting point is Math.floor( arr.length / 2 ), which gives us 2, corresponding to c in the array values. This is on iteration 0. The following instructions detail how we walk through an array with an odd number of values:

 Position | Direction | Iteration | New Position | Value at Position
----------+-----------+-----------+--------------+-------------------
     2    |      -    |      0    |       2      |         c
     2    |      +    |      1    |       3      |         d
     3    |      -    |      2    |       1      |         b
     1    |      +    |      3    |       4      |         e
     4    |      -    |      4    |       0      |         a

You'll see a pattern developing, when our iteration is odd we add it to our location to find our new position. When the iteration is negative, we subtract it from our position to find the new location.

When dealing with an array that has an even number of values, the rules are flipped. When you have an even number of values, we subtract odd iterations from location to get the new position, and add even iterations to our location to find the next value.

To demonstrate how little code is needed to perform this sorting logic, below is a minified version of the above logic (the aforementioned link is far more readable):

// DON'T USE THIS IN PRODUCTION, OR YOUR TEAM MAY KILL YOU
function gut(a){
    var o=[],s=a.length,l=Math.floor(s/2),c;
    for(c=0;c<s;c++)o.push(a[l+=(s%2?c%2?+c:-c:c%2?-c:+c)]);
    return o
}

Implementing the above logic in a more readable manner:

// Sort array from inside-out [a,b,c,d,e] -> [c,d,b,e,a]
function gut( arr ) {

    // Resulting array, Counting variable, Number of items, initial Location
    var out = [], cnt, 
        num = arr.length, 
        loc = Math.floor( num / 2 );

    // Cycle through as many times as the array is long
    for ( cnt = 0; cnt < num; cnt++ )
        // Protecting our cnt variable
        (function(){
            // If our array has an odd number of entries
            if ( num % 2 ) {
                // If on an odd iteration
                if ( cnt % 2 ) {
                    // Move location forward
                    loc = loc + (+cnt); 
                } else {
                    // Move location backwards
                    loc = loc + (-cnt);  
                }
            // Our array has an even number of entries
            } else {
                // If on an odd iteration
                if ( cnt % 2 ) {
                    // Move location backwards
                    loc = loc + (-cnt);
                } else {
                    // Move location forwards
                    loc = loc + (+cnt);
                }
            }
            // Push val at location to new array
            out.push( arr[ loc ] );
        })()

    // Return new array
    return out;

}
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Okay, let's solve this problem step by step:

  1. An array may either have an odd or an even number of elements:
  2. If the array has an odd number of elements:
    1. The middle element is at index (array.length - 1) / 2. Let this index be called mid.
    2. There are mid number of elements to the left of the middle element. Obviously.
    3. There are mid number of elements to the right of the middle element.
  3. If the array has an even number of elements:
    1. The middle element is at index array.length / 2. Let this index be called mid.
    2. There are mid number of elements to the left of the middle element. Obviously.
    3. There are mid - 1 number of elements to the right of the middle element.

Now let's create a function to tackle this problem using the above known data:

function processMidOut(array, callback) {
    var length = array.length;
    var odd = length % 2;         // odd is 0 for an even number, 1 for odd
    var mid = (length - odd) / 2; // succinct, isn't it?

    callback(array[mid]);         // process the middle element first

    for (var i = 1; i <= mid; i++) {  // process mid number of elements
        if (odd || i < mid)           // process one less element if even
            callback(array[mid + i]); // process the right side element first
        callback(array[mid - i]);     // process the left side element next
    }
}

That's all that there is to it. Now let's create some arrays and process them mid out:

var odd = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e"];
var even = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f"];

var oddOrder = "";
var evenOrder = "";

processMidOut(odd, function (element) {
    oddOrder += element;
});

processMidOut(even, function (element) {
    evenOrder += element;
});

alert(oddOrder);
alert(evenOrder);

You can find a working demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/xy267/1/

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Very interesting algorithm. Here is what I came with:

walkMidleOut = function(arr, callback) {
    var mid = (arr.length - arr.length % 2) / 2;
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        var s = -1,
            j = (i % 2 ? (s = 1, i + 1) : i) / 2,
            index = mid + s * j == arr.length ? 0 : mid + s * j;
        callback.call(arr, arr[index], index);
    }
}

Usage:

walkMidleOut([1,2,3,4,5], function(el, index) {
    console.log(el, index);
});

Will give you:

3 2
4 3
2 1
5 4
1 0

Function can be used with any number of elements, odd or even.

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How about using concat() and slice()? You can just pass this the index of the middle element.

Array.prototype.eachFrom = function(index){
  var index = index > this.length ? 0 : index;
  return [].concat(this.slice(index), this.slice(0, index));
}

so for example:

var arr = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'], arr = arr.eachFrom(2);
for( var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++ ) { doFunThings(); }
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