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Is there a way to easily handle manipulating URLs in JavaScript?

A bit of context:

I want to use ThickBox, the popular jQuery modal popup box, but unobtrusively. According to the ThickBox documentation I have to give all links that I want to be made modal a CSS class of "thickbox" and change the URL from...

http://www.mysite.com/mypopup

...to:

http://www.mysite.com/mypopup?height=200&width=300

I want to make this happen only if JavaScript is enabled.

So I get all links using jQuery and "hack" a detect for the '?' character in the URL, appending "&height..." or "?height..." accordingly.

In the grander scheme of things, this might muddle stuff up if the URL already has a "height" parameter, in which case I might just want to update the existing one as opposed to give it two.

It all smells a little.

I feel like I'm hacking code that can/must have been done properly once already!

So my question is:

Is there something in the JavaScript world (plugin or not) that would enable me to something like this:

var url = Url(elm.attr("href"));
url.parameter("width", "300");
url.parameter("height", "200");
elm.attr("href", url.toString())

Or:

var height = Url(elm.attr("href")).parameter("height");
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3 Answers 3

This function does that, just call it on the page of the URL you want to parse:

function gup( name )
{
  name = name.replace(/[\[]/,"\\\[").replace(/[\]]/,"\\\]");
  var regexS = "[\\?&]"+name+"=([^&#]*)";
  var regex = new RegExp( regexS );
  var results = regex.exec( window.location.href );
  if( results == null )
    return "";
  else
    return results[1];
}

//for the URL http://www.mysite.com/mypopup?height=200&width=300

var height = gup( 'height' );
var width = gup('width');
alert('Height: ' + height + ' Width: ' + width);

EDIT: I don't know how useful this will be to use (as it uses Prototype.js) but this is for reading and modifying the query string:

http://code.nontalk.com/2006/10/readmodify-querystring-variables-with.html

share|improve this answer
    
Nice.. but this doesn't allow me to set the URL query string parameters. The key was about manipulating URLs (or HREFs might be better way to put it). I could update this method to take a URL as a parameter very easily (as opposed to working with window.location.href), but it won't allow me to change or add query string parameters. –  joshcomley Aug 18 '09 at 13:39
    
My previous comment is now about a completely different answer! –  joshcomley Aug 18 '09 at 14:36
    
@joshcomley - I put it all back so your comment has meaning once again. –  karim79 Aug 18 '09 at 14:53
    
Cheers for that! :) –  joshcomley Aug 18 '09 at 14:57
    
+1 for the edit, although I will probably not use it because I don't want to have both jQuery and Prototype, it's useful to know about! –  joshcomley Aug 18 '09 at 15:12

Yes. The location Object in javascript has quite a lot of properties.

For your question: location.search = "width=300"; would apply "?width=300" to your url.

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This is one step closer, but what if there's 10 parameters and I want to update just one? I could regex it, but again it seems "hacky" and like something that someone must have done before, but better than me ;) –  joshcomley Aug 18 '09 at 13:43

You can probably do that using jQuery, i.e.

$(".thickbox").each(function() {
  this.href += "?height=200&width=300";
});

I've not tested this and it may be wrong, I'm not in a position to test it at the moment but hopefully it'll point you in the right direction if nothing else. If you have jQuery for Thickbox then you may as well leverage it for the manipulation ;)

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