Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some code to add attachments to an email. I'm adding them via the Stream overload of the Attachment class constructor. The code to do it looks like this:

List<UploadedDocument> docs = DataBroker.GetUploadedDocs(Convert.ToInt32(HttpContext.Current.Session["offer_id"].ToString()));
//no need to keep this in session
HttpContext.Current.Session["offer_id"] = null;
int counter = 1;
foreach (UploadedDocument doc in docs)
{
    stream = new MemoryStream(doc.doc);
    attach = new Attachment(stream, "Attachment-" + counter.ToString());
    message.Attachments.Add(attach);              
}

Where doc.doc is a byte array. I want to properly dispose of each attachment and stream, but I can't do it until the message has been sent, so I was thinking about just adding them to a List<Attachment> and List<Stream> and then iterating through and calling dispose.

Something like this:

List<Attachment> attachments;
List<Stream> streams;
//...
foreach(UploadedDocument doc in docs)
{
    stream = new MemoryStream(doc.doc);
    streams.Add(stream);
    attach = new Attachment(stream,"Name");
    attachments.Add(attach);
    message.Attachments.Add(attach);
}
//other processing
emailClient.Send(message);

if(attachments != null)
{
    foreach(Attachment attachment in attachments)
    {
        attachment.Dispose();
    }
}
if(streams != null)
{
    foreach(MemoryStream myStream in streams)
    {
        myStream.Dispose();
    }
}

But something tells me that won't dispose them properly if there is still a reference floating around that hasn't gotten garbage collected or something. Any thoughts?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The simplest way to handle this is to just call Dispose() on the MailMessage.

MailMessage.Dispose will automatically dispose all attachments, which in turn will close/Dispose() all of the underlying streams.

//other processing
emailClient.Send(message);
message.Dispose();  // Or just wrap this entire block in a using statement
share|improve this answer
    
Should have thought of that. Guess I just didn't trust that MailMessage's Dispose() would handle all of its resources. Thanks a bunch. –  Phillip Schmidt Oct 17 '12 at 16:35

This is already implemented by MailMessage.Dispose method:

protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    if (disposing && !this.disposed)
    {
        this.disposed = true;
        if (this.views != null)
        {
            this.views.Dispose();
        }
        if (this.attachments != null)
        {
            this.attachments.Dispose();
        }
        if (this.bodyView != null)
        {
            this.bodyView.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

Just wrap usage of MailMessage into using statement and all resources, used by the MailMessage will be released after you leave using block:

using(var message = new MailMessage(from, to))
{
   foreach (UploadedDocument doc in docs)
   {
       stream = new MemoryStream(doc.doc);
       attach = new Attachment(stream, "Attachment-" + counter.ToString());
       message.Attachments.Add(attach);              
   }

   emailClient.Send(message);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I should have thought of that -- just didn't want to blindly trust the Dispose() method of MailMessage. Guess that's what documentation is for. But who has time for that? :P –  Phillip Schmidt Oct 17 '12 at 16:37

There are already replies on right way (MailMessage.Dispose), so on "dispose them properly if there is still a reference...":

Dispose will (expected too) release resources at the moment of the call irrespective of who have references to the object. One of common approaches is to also have inner flag in the object that implements Dispose that will block any further calls by throwing "Object Disposed" exception.

You can (and probably already did) observe this behavior if you Dispose your streams before done using them. I.e. in your mail case you may try to dispose stream immediately after message.Attachments.Add(attach); which most likely will lead to "stream disposed" exception later during Send call.

Note that there are some objects like MemoryStream that have specially defined behavior after Dispose. I.e. MemoryStream blocks all calls except ToArray/Lenght/GetBuffer since one of the main purposes of this class is to give you resulting byte array of a stream. As side effect MemoryStream's Dispose is essentially only setting flag to block other calls (which is fine as this class does not have any native resources).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.