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Taking into account that CSS rules combine in various ways, do the following two HTML snippets render the same in the general case? If not, are there some reasonable cases when they do?

1)

<div class="outerrule">  
    <div class="innerrule1">content1</div>  
    <div class="innerrule2">content2</div>  
</div>  

2)

<div class="outerrule">  
    <div class="innerrule1">content1</div>  
</div>  
<div class="outerrule">  
    <div class="innerrule2">content2</div>  
</div>  
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Depends how your CSS is structured, obviously any sibling-based combinators (~ and +) will apply CSS differently, if at all. –  David Thomas Oct 17 '12 at 16:39
    
The whole point of class is to allow you to apply a style to multiple elements. –  Jrod Oct 17 '12 at 16:40
1  
Doesn't even need sibling-based combinators. div { padding: 5px } will cause the two examples to render differently. –  Quentin Oct 17 '12 at 16:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It depends on what the CSS is.

For example, if there is a CSS rule on .outerrule that adds a border, they will not render the same. See this example.

If, on the other hand, .outerrule just has some font styling, they will render the same. See this example.

It's really all dependant on the CSS itself. The rules themselves are "preserved" in that they will apply equally to each of the new elements. (Assuming, as in your code, they are all classes.)

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Taking into account that CSS rules combine in various ways, do the following two HTML snippets render the same in the general case?

Taking into account that CSS rules combine in various ways … there is no general case.

If there is no author CSS at all, then I think they will render the same as (as I think divs have 0 margin/padding by default).

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Both of these examples should render in the same way in most cases. A couple examples where you may find differences: .innerrule1 + .innerrule2 , .outerrule div:last-child, outerrule div:first-child

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