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interface TypeConverter<T, E> {
     T convert(E e);
}
class CollectionUtil() {
     public static <E> List<T> convertToList(List<E> fromList, TypeConverter<T, E> conv) {
     {
            if(fromList== null) return null;
            List<T> newList = new ArrayList<T>(fromList.size())  
            for(E e : fromList) 
            {
                newList.add(conv.convert(e));
            }
            return newList;
     } 
}

Above code explains converting from List of String to List of Integer by implementing TypeConverter interface for String, Integer. Are there already any collections conversion utility methods exists in any API like list to set and so on?

share|improve this question
    
Guava has one. Related/dupe question: stackoverflow.com/questions/18524/… –  BalusC Oct 17 '12 at 16:44
    
Such conversions are not safe. So they can not be part of Java API –  Amit Deshpande Oct 17 '12 at 16:47
    
@AmitD: I don't see the point of them being unsafe. In the shown code there is no explicit cast, this means that no type error will be thrown at runtime because of the strong static type checker. –  Jack Oct 17 '12 at 16:56
    
@Jack According to me TypeConverter is unsafe because at some point of time developers will 'cast' values from one type to another and resulting ClassCastExceptions. –  Amit Deshpande Oct 17 '12 at 17:35
    
@AmitD: I don't see how it is possible if TypeConverter is generic on both parameter and return value and no casts are used. Using your assumption the whole Java language is unsafe because at some point you can always do a type cast :) Only a language that forbids type casting is inherently safe. You say that developers will, I say that developers may but this is true everywhere. –  Jack Oct 17 '12 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In Guava:

List<String> strings = Arrays.asList("1", "2", "3");
List<Integer> integers =
        Lists.transform(strings, new Function<String, Integer>() {
            @Override
            public Integer apply(String input) {
                return Integer.parseInt(input);
            }
        });

Maven

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.google.guava</groupId>
    <artifactId>guava</artifactId>
    <version>13.0</version>
</dependency>

In Collections 15 package:

final List<Integer> integers =
        ListUtils.transformedList(strings, new Transformer<String, Integer>() {
            @Override
            public Integer transform(String s) {
                return Integer.parseInt(s);
            }
        });

Maven

<dependency>
    <groupId>net.sourceforge.collections</groupId>
    <artifactId>collections-generic</artifactId>
    <version>4.01</version>
</dependency>

In Functional Java

List<Integer> integers = List.list("1", "2", "3").map(new F<String, Integer>() {
    @Override
    public Integer f(String s) {
        return Integer.parseInt(s);
    }
});

Maven

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.functionaljava</groupId>
    <artifactId>functionaljava</artifactId>
    <version>3.1</version>
</dependency>

Note that this library uses different set of collections.

...bonus in Scala:

Seq("1", "2", "3") map {_.toInt}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 And note that the result of Guava's Lists.transform is a view, not a copy. –  Paul Bellora Oct 18 '12 at 4:40

Try:

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