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When intentionally failing a test case (for example when an exception is not thrown) I've seen people use both fail() and assertTrue(false). Are there any advantages to using one or the other?

try {
    //method call that should throw exception
    fail("oops");
} catch (Exception e) {}

vs.

try {
    //method call that should throw exception
    assertTrue("oops", false);
} catch (Exception e) {}
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Why do you want to fail a test? –  Victor Oct 17 '12 at 16:54
4  
When an exception should have been thrown but wasn't. Do you not agree with my examples? –  Trevor Oct 17 '12 at 16:59
    
Exception should be an exception. A good code should never expect an exception, your code should avoid exception before it was thrown. –  Victor Oct 17 '12 at 17:05
4  
@Victor normally I agree but if you have a complicated Exception stack (lots of custom exceptions, possible bubbling up) you may wish to make sure the correct exception is thrown in varying cases. –  BeRecursive Oct 17 '12 at 17:09
2  
@Victor I think you've been writing unit tests wrong, if you're never testing that exceptions get thrown in an error situation. You want to check failure paths as well as success paths. This will often require checking whether or not an exception has been thrown. –  Izkata Oct 17 '12 at 20:31
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5 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Are there any advantages to using one or the other?

Functionally, no. However, fail() conveys the intention more clearly, and is therefore better.

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Use JUnit's expected parameter in the @Test annotation

@Test(expected = ArithmeticException.class)  
public void divisionWithException() {  
    int i = 1/0;
}  

This will fail if an ArithmeticException is not thrown.

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2  
The OP does say "for example, when an exception is not thrown" There could be other scenarios. –  NullUserException Oct 17 '12 at 16:56
3  
I have found that the EpectedException rule is a more robust mechanism for testing expected exceptions because it can be placed immediately before the method under test thereby ensuring it was not the test setup that threw an exception. –  John B Oct 17 '12 at 16:57
    
But we are EXPECTING an exception to be thrown. So if it doesn't it should fail. Why bother with try/catch logic? We want the exception. –  BeRecursive Oct 17 '12 at 16:57
    
Concur with NullUserException –  John B Oct 17 '12 at 16:58
1  
@BeRecursive Regarding your response to Izkata, I have seen a surprising number of occasions when I am expecting a NullPointerException and the test passes because it was thrown from the wrong place. Not to overkill this subject, but in my experience it is not "highly unlikely" when dealing with exceptions like NPE, IAE and Runtime. –  John B Oct 18 '12 at 10:17
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assertTrue just calls fail.

IMHO fail() is simpler and clearer.

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Both can be used (though fail is better because that's what is really intended), but since you're using JUnit, you may use @Test(expected=MyException.class) instead.

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Use fail, otherwise someone will look at the failure in the log and think "What's false that should be true".

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