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I have an Accessor class that retrieves Items. It can also take an Item as a parameter and return the latest version of that Item from the database. When it creates an Item it passes itself as a parameter to the Item.

I want the compiler to statically require that an Accessor instance will only accept Items that were created by itself. This was covered by How to use Scala's singleton-object types? however I also want an Item instance to be able to pass itself as a parameter to its own Accessor to retrieve the latest version of itself.

The difficulty with this is that a type parameter in the Item class definition like so

class Item[A <: Accessor](acc: A)

cannot refer to the type of acc itself. From the perspective of Item acc.type <: A <: Accessor so this in Item, which is an Item[A], is not an Item[acc.type]. Thus this doesn't work:

class Item[A <: Accessor](acc: A) {
    acc.accept(this) // Type Mismatch: found Item[A], required Item[Item.this.acc.type]
}

class Accessor {
    def make() = new Item[this.type](this)
    def accept(item: Item[this.type]) = "accepted"
}

I then tried this:

object A1 extends Accessor[A1.type](A1) // illegal cyclic reference involving object A1

class Item[+A <: Accessor[A]](acc: A) {
    acc.accept(this)
    A1.accept(this) // Compile error (good)
}

class Accessor[+A <: Accessor[A]](me: => A) {
    def make = new Item[A](me)
    def accept(item: Item[A]) = "accepted"
}

where the problem is actually creating an instance of Accessor.

I tried a variation on the above which turned out to be a messier incarnation of the same fundamental dilemma:

object A1 extends Accessor {
    type A = A1.type
    def me = A1
}

class Item[+AA <: Accessor](acc: AA {type A = AA}) {
    acc.accept(this)
    A1.accept(this) // Compile error (good)
}

class Accessor {
    type A <: Accessor
    def me: A // can't do {type A = A} because its a cyclic error again
    def make = new Item[A](me) // Type Mismatch: found this.A, required this.A {type A = Accessor.this.A}
    def accept(item: Item[A]) = "accepted"
}

Finally I tried making the A type parameter contravariant so that Item[A] is a subtype of Item[acc.type] and will be accepted by acc.

val a1 = new Accessor
val a2 = new Accessor
val item1 = a1.make
val item2 = a2.make
val itemA = new Item[Accessor](a2)
val item12 = new Item[A1.type](a2) // compile error (good)

a1.accept(itemA) // no compile error (bad), but I can prevent creation of Item[Accessor]s
a1.accept(item2) // compile error (good)

class Item[-A <: Accessor](acc: A) {
    acc.accept(this)
    val acc2 = new Accessor
    acc2.accept(this) // compile error (good) 
    // here Item[Accessor] <: Item[A] <: Item[acc.type] 
    // and Item[Accessor] <: Item[acc2.type]
    // but Item[A] is not necessarily <: Item[acc2.type]
}

class Accessor {
    def make() = new Item[this.type](this)
    def accept(item: Item[this.type]) = "accepted"
}

This comes closest to working of anything I have tried. The only problem is it stuffs up my object hierarchy because I can't do this:

class ImmutableAccessor extends Accessor

class ImmutableItem[-A <: ImmutableAccessor](acc: A) extends Item[A] // fails due to contravariance in A

If only there were some way to specify that a type parameter must be a singleton type. So for example you could say (I'm inventing notation here)

class Item[A:type <: Accessor](acc: A)

And A would then be the singleton type of acc and we'd be laughing.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The secret sauce we need here is to exploit the <:< class found in Predef, using an implicit value. You are quite right that the "with Singleton" didn't do everything we wanted.

class Item[-A <: Accessor](acc: A)(implicit sing: A <:< Singleton) {
  acc.accept(this)
}

class Accessor {
  def make() = new Item[this.type](this)
  def accept(item: Item[this.type]) = "accepted"
}

class BetterItem[-B <: BetterAccessor](b: B)(implicit bsing: B <:< Singleton)
    extends Item[B](b)(bsing)
}

class BetterAccessor extends Accessor

Now the inheritance works better. We can do stuff like the following

val a1 = new Accessor
val a2 = new Accessor
val b3 = new BetterAccessor

val i1 = a1.make
val i3 = b3.make

a1.accept(i1)     // GOOD
//a2.accept(i1)   // compile time error
//b3.accept(i1)   // compile time error
//new Item[Accessor](a2)   // compile time error
//a1.accept(i3)   // compile time error
b3.accept(i3)     // GOOD

And we get compile time errors exactly where we want.

share|improve this answer

I do not have a full solution regarding handling inheritance, but I can suggest a minor change to prevent lines like

a1.accept(itemA)

from compiling. Include an explicit "with Singleton" in the definition of Item.

class Item[-A <: Accessor with Singleton](acc: A) {

Then trying to create a new "Item[Accessor]" won't compile.

share|improve this answer
    
That "with Singleton" thing looks like the feature I was wishing for. It should allow a statement like class Item[A <: Accessor with Singleton](acc: A) to ensure that A is exactly the same type as acc.type and thus permit an Item to pass itself to its Accessor. Unfortunately, the compiler does not appear to recognise this logic and still thinks A >: acc.type. – Chris Barnett Oct 18 '12 at 13:29

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