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I am new to objective and just trying to understand simple concepts. I have read Objective C for dummies and Cocoa Programming for Mac OSX (most of it). I tried to make a simple small program on my own and realized I know very little.

I keep getting the "Use of Undeclared Identifier "calculateAge', did you mean 'Calculate' " error.

Can anyone please tell me what's wrong with my code below and why? Thanks a bunch in advance.

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>


@interface Calculate : NSObject
{
    int myYear;
    int nowYear;
}


- (int) calculateAge:(int)birthYear:(int)nowYear;

@end



@implementation Calculate



- (int) calculateAge:(int)birthYear:(int)nowYear// need myYear
{

    NSLog(@"The birthYear is: %i\n", birthYear);
    int myAge = nowYear - birthYear;        
    //NSLog(@"The nowYear is: %i\n", nowYear);
    NSLog(@"The age is: %i\n", myAge);
    return myAge;
}



int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    @autoreleasepool {


        NSLog(@"Hello, World!");
        int myY = 1963;
        int nowY = 2012;
        int myYear = 1963;
        int nowYear = 2012;
        //int myAge = calculateAge:(int) birthYear: (int) nowYear;
        int myAge = calculateAge:(int) myY: (int) nowY;
        NSLog(@"The nowYear is: %i\n", nowYear);
        NSLog(@"The age is: %i\n", myAge);

    }
    return 0;
}
@end
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by H2CO3, casperOne Oct 17 '12 at 17:59

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
what exactly does the compiler say? (the error, I mean). –  elyashiv Oct 17 '12 at 17:20
    
Don't you need to send the calculateAge signal to an instance of your Calculate class? –  Joe Day Oct 17 '12 at 17:21

2 Answers 2

You seem to be conflating the method name with the parameter list. A proper signature would look something like this:

- (int)calculateAgeFromBirthYear:(int)birthYear currentYear:(int)currentYear

This could then be implemented like this:

- (int)calculateAgeFromBirthYear:(int)birthYear currentYear:(int)currentYear
{

    NSLog(@"The birthYear is: %i\n", birthYear);
    int myAge = currentYear - birthYear;        
    //NSLog(@"The nowYear is: %i\n", currentYear);
    NSLog(@"The age is: %i\n", myAge);
    return myAge;
}

This could then be called like this:

Calculate *calculator = [[Calculate  alloc] init];
int myAge = [calculator calculateAgeFromBirthYear:myY currentYear:nowY];

Don't implement main inside a class implementation; it belongs outside in the global namespace, preferably in its own file.

share|improve this answer
    
Dead on Warrenm, it seems I am rather confused on where to put what and why. Your fixes did the trick. I guess it's time to continue reading. Thanks!!! –  Shera Oct 17 '12 at 18:03

There is no need to declare the instance variables in the interface.
The last @end needs to be before the main function, it is not part of the class, it used the class.
The Calculate class needs to be instantiated and the call needs to be made to the instantiated class.
The calculateAge... method should be renamed to indicate each argument.
Variables should be given full names, abreviations generall end up making things less clear.

Here is an example:

@interface Calculate : NSObject
- (int) calculateAgeWithBirthYear:(int)birthYear nowYear:(int)nowYear;
@end

@implementation Calculate
- (int) calculateAgeWithBirthYear:(int)birthYear nowYear:(int)nowYear// need myYear
{
    NSLog(@"The birthYear is: %i\n", birthYear);
    int myAge = nowYear - birthYear;
    NSLog(@"The age is: %i\n", myAge);
    return myAge;
}
@end

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    @autoreleasepool {

        NSLog(@"Hello, World!");

        int myBirthYear = 1963;
        int nowYear = 2012;

        Calculate *calculator = [[Calculate alloc] init];
        int myAge = [calculator calculateAgeWithBirthYear:myBirthYear nowYear:nowYear];

        NSLog(@"The nowYear is: %i\n", nowYear);
        NSLog(@"The age is: %i\n", myAge);

    }
    return 0;
}

NSLog output:

Hello, World!
The birthYear is: 1963
The age is: 49
The nowYear is: 2012
The age is: 49

Using instance variables created by `@property~ statements:

@interface Calculate : NSObject
@property int myYear;
@property int nowYear;

- (int) calculateAge;
@end

@implementation Calculate
- (int) calculateAge // need myYear
{
    NSLog(@"The birthYear is: %i\n", self.myYear);
    int myAge = self.nowYear - self.myYear;
    NSLog(@"The age is: %i\n", myAge);
    return myAge;
}
@end

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    @autoreleasepool {

        NSLog(@"Hello, World!");

        Calculate *calculator = [[Calculate alloc] init];
        calculator.myYear = 1963;
        calculator.nowYear = 2012;

        int myAge = [calculator calculateAge];

        NSLog(@"The nowYear is: %i\n", calculator.nowYear);
        NSLog(@"The age is: %i\n", myAge);

    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The instance variables in the interface was originally put becouse as I evolve my simple program I will have the variables brought in from user input. User will enter birth year, I will get the current year from the computer and then calculate the age. All in good time, I am rather slow but wanted to see something on the screen. Thanks –  Shera Oct 17 '12 at 18:06
    
In that case use them instead of passing the value in. –  Zaph Oct 17 '12 at 18:19

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