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delete duplicate records in SQL Server

I have a table in which unique records are denoted by a composite key, such as (COL_A, COL_B).

I have checked and confirmed that I have duplicate rows in my table by using the following query:

select COL_A, COL_B, COUNT(*)
from MY_TABLE
group by COL_A, COL_B
having count(*) > 1
order by count(*) desc

Now, I would like to remove all duplicate records but keep only one.

Could someone please shed some light on how to achieve this with 2 columns?

EDIT: Assume the table only has COL_A and COL_B

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marked as duplicate by Blam, martin clayton, Ryan Bigg, Reigel, Lucifer Oct 18 '12 at 1:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Are the rest of the columns the same? How do you decide which you want to keep? –  FJT Oct 17 '12 at 17:26
    
@FionaT, In this case, I don't care which one I keep as long as I keep one. This is because they all have the same (COL_A, COL_B) pair. For simplicity's sake, there are only COL_A and COL_B. –  czchlong Oct 17 '12 at 17:43
1  
If you don't have another field (hopefully a key field), then your delete statement will delete all records. You have to have another field to differentiate the records. –  Data Masseur Oct 17 '12 at 18:53
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/3317433/… Come on all I did was search SO for TSQL delete duplicate records. –  Blam Oct 17 '12 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1st solution, It is flexible, because you can add more columns than COL_A and COL_B :

-- create table with identity filed
-- using idenity we can decide which row we can delete
create table MY_TABLE_COPY
(
  id int identity,
  COL_A varchar(30), 
  COL_B  varchar(30)
  /*
     other columns
  */
)
go
-- copy data
insert into MY_TABLE_COPY (COL_A,COL_B/*other columns*/)
select COL_A, COL_B /*other columns*/
from MY_TABLE
group by COL_A, COL_B
having count(*) > 1
-- delete data from  MY_TABLE
-- only duplicates (!)
delete MY_TABLE
from MY_TABLE_COPY c, MY_TABLE t
where c.COL_A=t.COL_A 
and c.COL_B=t.COL_B
go
-- copy data without duplicates
insert into MY_TABLE (COL_A, COL_B /*other columns*/)
select t.COL_A, t.COL_B /*other columns*/
from MY_TABLE_COPY t
where t.id = (
               select max(id) 
               from MY_TABLE_COPY c  
               where t.COL_A = c.COL_A
               and  t.COL_B = c.COL_B
             ) 
go

2nd solution If you have really two columns in MY_TABLE you can use:

-- create table and copy data
select distinct COL_A, COL_B
into MY_TABLE_COPY
from MY_TABLE
-- delete data from  MY_TABLE 
-- only duplicates (!)
delete MY_TABLE
from MY_TABLE_COPY c, MY_TABLE t
where c.COL_A=t.COL_A 
and c.COL_B=t.COL_B
go
-- copy data without duplicates
insert into MY_TABLE
select t.COL_A, t.COL_B
from MY_TABLE_COPY t
go
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You could have just used a SELECT DISTINCT on your INSERT into MY_TABLE_COPY. Then you wouldn't need the where clause with the subquery when reinserting them. Up vote for working around the lack of uniqueness though. –  Data Masseur Oct 17 '12 at 19:18
    
@Data Masseur Thanks. Yes I could used a SELECT DISTINCT, but It will work if in MY_TABLE we have more then two columns. –  Parado Oct 17 '12 at 19:28
    
@DataMasseur I edited the post with you suggestions. –  Parado Oct 17 '12 at 19:38
    
Thanks for the detailed answers, will try and let you know. –  czchlong Oct 17 '12 at 20:44

Try:

-- Copy Current Table
SELECT * INTO #MY_TABLE_COPY FROM MY_TABLE 

-- Delte all rows from current able
DELETE FROM MY_TABLE

-- Insert only unique values, removing your duplicates
INSERT INTO MY_TABLE
SELECT DISTINCT * FROM #MY_TABLE_COPY

-- Remove Temp Table
DROP TABLE #MY_TABLE_COPY

That should work as long as you don't break any foreign keys when deleting rows from MY_TABLE.

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