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I've been using optional parameters in a limited fashion for some time now with .NET 4. I've recently thought about how the optional parameters are implemented and something dawned on me.

Take the following example:

public interface ITest
{
    void Go(string val = "Interface");
}

The only requirement for implementing this is that the largest form of the signature void Go (string val) be implemented, in fact we need not implement the optional parameter because the compiler takes care of that wire-up (although the option to use optional parameters will not be available when using the concrete class directly).

With this said, to provide the functionality in both places, and for it to be discover-able in the implementation, one could implement the optional declaration in both interface AND implementation. In fact, the productivity tool ReSharper will pull this optional declaration up to the concrete type automatically when implementing an interface. This seems the logical thing to do. However...

What's to stop us from using different values in the concrete type and interface? This set off my alarm bells this morning as if someone goes in to change that value, and forgets to persist it down the inheritance of overrides / interfaces, the behaviour will be completely different depending on how you access the object. This could be very frustrating to debug.

Try this LINQpad Script:

void Main()
{
    IA iface = new A();
    A cls = new A();

    iface.Go();
    cls.Go();
}

interface IA
{
    void Go(string val = "Interface");
}

class A : IA
{
    public void Go(string val = "Class") { val.Dump(); }
}

The output will be:

Interface
Class

Which brings me to my actual question:

Question:

What (if any?) way can we safeguard this, without losing the ability to use the optional parameter variant from the concrete class, and so it's discoverable / readable to the coder?

Has anyone encountered this problem before? How did you solve it? Is there any best practices that could help prevent this problem from becoming prevalent in a multi-developer large-scale codebase?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Nothing stops you from doing that. Using optional parameters bakes the value into the method call. So as you are seeing, calling IA.Go() and A.Go() give you different values because they're compiled to IA.Go("Interface") and A.Go("Class").

The way around it (meaning to only supply the "default" parameter in the implementation) is to have an overload instead of optional parameters:

interface IA
{
    void Go();
    void Go(string val);
}

public class A : IA
{
    public void Go()
    {
        Go("Class");
    }
    public void Go(string val) { val.Dump(); }
}

Some other options:

  • Add a unit test that checks for that condition. You'd have to do it for every implementation, however.
  • Research creating a custom code analysis rule.
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I know how it works, I was curious if anyone had come up with a way around it that isn't as draconian as "dont use them". Did you know of any way of tripping a warning or some best practice that can help mitigate the risks? –  Aren Oct 17 '12 at 18:51
3  
You could add a unit test that checks for that condition. You'd have to do it for every implementation. You could also research creating a custom code analysis rule. –  D Stanley Oct 17 '12 at 19:03
    
+1 A Static Code Analysis step could be a good way of enforcing this. –  Aren Oct 17 '12 at 19:19
    
Your comment is almost more worth than your answer :) very good comment (and you should add it to your answer as it really adds value). –  Styxxy Oct 17 '12 at 20:36
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I think it is the nature of C# and you have to live with that. Look at the example below. Does the same without optional parameters i.e. behavior is different depending on how you access your object.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IA iface = new A();
        A cls = new A();

        iface.Test();
        cls.Test();

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

interface IA
{
    void Test();
}

class A : IA
{
    public void Test()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Class");
    }

    void IA.Test()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Interface");
    }
}
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1  
I thought of this, but the problem with this comparison is that whoever implements A is explicitly causing different behavior for whatever reason. In the OP's example, it could be entirely unintentional. –  Bobson Oct 17 '12 at 19:10
    
@Bobson: Exactly, the accidental change is what I'm trying to gaurd against here. –  Aren Oct 17 '12 at 19:20
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