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I'm creating a view where I pretty much replicate the data of the original user, but I also have an attribute in which I want to put the number of occurrences the user has in the downloads table.

CREATE VIEW customer_count_streams_vw(
sid_customer
systemuser_id
postcode
age
gender
num_streams) 
AS 
SELECT
user.sid_customer,
user.systemuser_id,
user.postcode,
user.age,
user.gender,
num_streams 
FROM md_customer 
INNER JOIN ods_streaming AS num_streams (
SELECT COUNT(ods_streaming.sid_customer) 
WHERE ods_streaming.sid_customer = md_customer.sid_customer)

What I want is to place the result of the part:

SELECT COUNT(ods_streaming.sid_customer) 
WHERE ods_streaming.sid_customer = md_customer.sid_customer

into the num_streams field.

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USER is a reserved word in most, if not all, database engines –  user1598390 Oct 17 '12 at 18:11
    
Thank you. This is just the draft for the code, so I will change it for something else when I run it eventually. –  olovholm Oct 18 '12 at 10:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your query should be

SELECT
user.sid_customer,
user.systemuser_id,
user.postcode,
user.age,
user.gender,
num_streams 
FROM md_customer 
INNER JOIN 
( 
        SELECT sid_customer, COUNT(ods_streaming.sid_customer) num_streams 
        FROM ods_streaming group by sid_customer
) AS ods_streaming  
ON ods_streaming.sid_customer = md_customer.sid_customer

Above query will return rows for customers with row in md_customer and also a row in ods_streaming. If you want all customers and their count (including 0) then your query should be

SELECT
cust.sid_customer,
cust.systemuser_id,
cust.postcode,
cust.age,
cust.gender,
COUNT(strm.sid_customer) num_streams 
FROM 
   md_customer cust
LEFT OUTER JOIN ods_streaming  strm   
   ON cust.sid_customer = strm.sid_customer
group by 
cust.sid_customer,
cust.systemuser_id,
cust.postcode,
cust.age,
cust.gender
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't look quite right. Shouldn't there be an AS before num_streams, as in COUNT(ods_streaming.sid_customer) AS num_streams? –  Robert Harvey Oct 17 '12 at 18:07
    
No you don't need as to use alias for column names. It is not required. –  rs. Oct 17 '12 at 18:10
    
I did some modifications to the command, but this helped me understand the concept. Thank you. –  olovholm Oct 28 '12 at 14:23

Maybe you can try to use the group by for the count, instead of a sub-select.

SELECT
md_customer.sid_customer,
md_customer.systemuser_id,
md_customer.postcode,
md_customer.age,
md_customer.gender,
count(ods_streaming.num_streams)
FROM md_customer 
INNER JOIN ods_streaming 
on ods_streaming.sid_customer = md_customer.sid_customer
group by 1,2,3,4,5;

You should avoid doing sub-selects like these... this group by should make things a little bit faster

share|improve this answer
SELECT
    u.sid_customer,
    u.systemuser_id,
    u.postcode,
    u.age,
    u.gender,
    num_streams.amount
FROM 
    md_customer u INNER JOIN (
            SELECT 
                ods_streaming.sid_customer,
                COUNT(ods_streaming.sid_customer) as amount 
            FROM
                ods_streaming 
            GROUP BY ods_streaming.sid_customer

        ) num_streams  ON ( num_streams.sid_customer = u.sid_customer )

Besides: user is a reserved word in most, if not all, database engines

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