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Essentially I'd like to have the following structure:

class Group < ActiveRecord::Base

end

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base

end

Group_1 (parent)
  Group_2 (child)
    Person_1 (grandchild)
    Person_2 (grandchild)
  Person_3 (child)
  Group_3 (child)
    Person_4 (grandchild)
    Group_4 (grandchild)
      Person_5 (great grandchild)

I've done research by trying out the following gems: acts_as_tree, ancestry, nested_sets and closure_tree.

They are able to keep a tree which is one half of the challenge I have; but they are unable to add another model to the tree structure as they are always expecting the children to be of the same model. [Ex: ActiveRecord::AssociationTypeMismatch: Group (#2179078840) expected, got Person(#2171128160) from closure_tree gem]

Is it in anyway possible to have the structure defined above to work with two different models inside the tree?

share|improve this question

You can define a model which will be used for "tree nodes". Each node can have a boolean field which indicates whether it is a leaf or not, and another field (or fields) which points to the Group/Person which is "held" by that node. (If you use just one field to point to the Group/Person, then you could use a polymorphic association, or you could write up a custom SQL query which retrieves from either "groups" or "people" depending on the value of the "leaf" field.)

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Essentially, you want Person to inherit from Group. I don't know why you would want this structure since group and person aren't the same type of thing.

Maybe you want to elaborate on the functionality you're trying to share. The more "ruby" way to share functionality amongst two very different objects is through Modules, not through inheritance.

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I would approach this using the habtm method. But you may want to be careful as to how you architect your database tables. The Rails code will look as such

class Group < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :people, class: Person
end

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :groups
end
share|improve this answer

Do you need the features that come with a Tree. If not, you could do something simple...

Put a group_id on each object. A nil group_id would mean it belonged to the root.

class Group < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :group  # The parent

  has_many :groups
  has_many :people
end

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :group

end
share|improve this answer

There are examples in the closure_tree tests that use STI, or Single Table Inheritance, which is what it looks like you want to use. Read up on STI, though—a "Group" doesn't seem like it'd have the same sort of fields or behavior as a "group", so this may not be the correct solution.

Assuming it is, though, create a db migration that adds a String type column to your model. I'd name the table something generic, like "nodes".

class AddTypeToNode < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_column :nodes, :type, :string
  end
end

Then create a base class and your subclasses:

class Node < ActiveRecord::Base
  abstract_class = true
  acts_as_tree
end

class Group < Node
end

class Person < Node
end

You'll then be able to do this:

g1 = Group.create(:name => "Group_1")
g2 = g1.add_child(Group.create(:name => "Group_2"))
p1 = g2.add_child(Person.create(:name => "Person_1"))
p2 = g2.add_child(Person.create(:name => "Person_2"))
…
share|improve this answer

FULLY WORKING this can be improved but I only did what you want


gem 'ancestry'

group.rb


class Group < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :parent_id, :name
  has_many :people
  attr_accessor :relationship
  has_ancestry

  def people_group_children
    (people + children).sort_by(&:created_at)
  end

  RELATIONSHIP = ['parent', 'child', 'grandchild']
  def relationship_by_depth(depth_diff)
    @relationship = RELATIONSHIP[depth_diff] || (depth_diff-2) * 'great ' + RELATIONSHIP[2]
  end

  def arrange_as_desired(ancestor_depth = 0, parent_depth = 0)
    output = '<ul>'.html_safe
    output.safe_concat name + '(' + relationship_by_depth(depth - ancestor_depth) + ')'
    people_group_children.map do |child|
      output.safe_concat '<li>'
      output.safe_concat child.arrange_as_desired(ancestor_depth, depth)
      output.safe_concat '</li>'
    end
    output.safe_concat '</ul>'
    output
  end
end

person.rb


class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :group_id, :name
  belongs_to :group
  attr_accessor :relationship, :depth
  def parent; group; end

  def people_group_children; []; end

  RELATIONSHIP = ['parent', 'child', 'grandchild']
  def relationship_by_depth(depth_diff)
    @relationship = RELATIONSHIP[depth_diff] || 'great ' * (depth_diff-2) + RELATIONSHIP[2]
  end

  def arrange_as_desired(ancestor_depth = 0, parent_depth = 0)
    output = '<ul>'.html_safe
    @depth = parent_depth + 1
    output.safe_concat name + "(#{relationship_by_depth(depth - ancestor_depth)})"
    people_group_children.map do |child|
      output.safe_concat '<li>'
      output.safe_concat child.arrange_as_desired(ancestor_depth, depth)
      output.safe_concat '</li>'
    end
    output.safe_concat '</ul>'
    output
  end
end

groups\show.html.erb


<ul>
  <%= raw @group.arrange_as_desired %>
</ul>


Migrations

create_groups.rb


class CreateGroups < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :groups do |t|
      t.string :name
      t.string :ancestry

      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

create_people.rb


class CreatePeople < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :people do |t|
      t.integer :group_id
      t.string :name

      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end
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