Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following C code and I'm trying to understand it.

char buffer[128];
A* a = (A*) &buffer[sizeof(A*)];

At first, I was trying to do this with A* a = (A*) buffer[sizeof(A*)]; this gives me a warning and I guess it is because this would actually give me the char at sizeof(A*) and cast it?. Another confusion is since buffer is already a pointer to the first element of the array why do I need a &operator to get a pointer to cast to A*. Can some one help me to understand this piece of code?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
You mention a warning. What was it? –  Colin D Oct 17 '12 at 18:55
    
What is A typedef'd to? –  Mike Oct 17 '12 at 19:06
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The line in question takes your 128-byte buffer, looks at the index at sizeof(A*) and returns a reference to it, casting it to a pointer of type A.

Another confusion is since buffer is already a pointer to the first element of the array why do I need a &operator to get a pointer to cast to A*.

Well, this is because, when you write index the buffer array by using a subscript with[], it returns the value pointed to at that index of the buffer, not the memory location itself. By prepending & you are getting the memory address of that data.

share|improve this answer
add comment

(A*) - Cast to pointer of data structure A

&buffer[] - Go to the location in memory pointed to by buffer

[sizeof(A*)] - Use the size of a pointer to an A data structure as the index

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.